Good Working Method?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by jmolligo, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. jmolligo

    jmolligo Member

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    Hi:

    I just wanted to get some opinions on a planned working method I have.

    I just switched from Large Format to 120; I've also switched to a much smaller living area.

    I've decided to use T-Max 100 as my primary film; with T-Max Developer (not RS), and Kodak Rapid Fix (to harden or not to harden, I've never quite determined which is best).

    This will be my first time using T-Max Developer and many years since using a small tank (I'm use to 1/2 gallon tanks or tray processing).

    In order to avoid excess mixing and to save storage space; I plan to mix the Developer and Fixer in gallon quantities and keep the working solutions in gallon containers (there is, of course, no other practical way to mix less Kodak Rapid Fix, but T-Max developer could be mixed each time from concentrate).

    I plan to use the developer in a 500ml tank, returning the used developer to the gallon jug after each processing session (same with the fixer); discarding the gallon of developer after the recommended 48 rolls have been processed (or two months, which ever comes first).

    Is this a reasonable way to proceed; are there any detrimental effects to returning used T-Max developer to a gallon container after using a partial quantity (500ml)?

    Is it a good idea to use a hardener in the fixer with 120 film?

    Thanks for taking the time to look this over; and for any thoughts or suggestions.
     
  2. rwboyer

    rwboyer Member

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    One. Personally I would choose to do one shot development with just about anything vs a non-replenished developer for better consistency with low volume processing. What you have specified is not even a replenished situation and you also did not specify a dilution. I personally believe if you try to use strait TMAX or even the lower dilutions of TMAX you will have a hell of a time controlling TMX from a consistency standpoint - it is a very responsive film and it is probably a good idea to use a slower working developer one shot for slightly longer development times so that a small timing error is not so influential.

    Personally I like Pyrocat HD with TMX if you want something a little more TMAX/D76'y XTOL 1+2 or 1+3 would be a great choice - even Rodinal 1+50 or 1+100 would be a good choice.

    Forget the hardener.

    Of course the fixer can be reused - Just pay attention to the capacity recommendations.

    I prefer myself a water stop bath and an alkaline rapid fix like TF4 or TF5.

    RB
     
  3. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I'm not sure why you think that Kodak Rapid Fix cannot be mixed in less than one gallon amounts. I have certainly done so in the past. I have never used the hardener - with your choice of film (or any other Kodak, Ilford or Fuji B&W film for that matter) it is not necessary.

    As for the developer, I would recommend either one shot use with any of a number of developers (I use HC110) or, based on what I see posted here, regularly replenished, using XTol.

    Matt
     
  4. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Evening, John,

    I agree with RB that mixing T-Max Developer directly from concentrate immediately before use is the only way to go (1:7 for 10 minutes is my standard for T-100, varied somewhat depending on the contrast desired). The concentrate keeps well, and the bottle takes up less storage space than a gallon jug.

    Konical
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2010
  5. Denis R

    Denis R Member

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    clearing time

    t-max dev designed for non-replenished systems
    use with roll film only
    dilute 1:4

    kodak only offers hardening fixers for film
    their only non-hardening fixer is for processing rc paper in continuous roller-transport processors

    if you don't want hardener, use Ilford Rapid Fixer


    as a side note: some films recommend hardener, such as ADOX CHS

     
  6. jmolligo

    jmolligo Member

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    Thanks for the help.

    I may rethink the developer I will use. As a note: the dilution I was planning for the TMax Dev was 1:4; also, for clarification, I just noted that I thought it was impractical, not impossible, to mix less than a gallon of Kodak Rapid Fix (especially if the hardener is included) - at least in the case of a "closet darkroom".
    I should also note that I was working with the assumption that T-Max developer would be the best match for T-Max film, but maybe it's not best suited to my type of usage.

    I liked Xtol quite a bit for sheet films and may go with that (as was suggested). Rodinal, too, is a great developer (but I think I prefer using Xtol). I've never tried the Pyro type developers (although I would like to trying working with them some day). Or maybe I'll go one shot with the T-Max (a 1:7 dilution would be fairly economical).
    So, I will put some thought more thought into it.

    Thanks again.
     
  7. Denis R

    Denis R Member

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    solution

    D-76 stock or 1:1 your choice
    easy to work with

    I usually use 1:1 to lengthen the dev times to make for less chance of error
    (forgetting agitation for a minute or two) having an impact on results
    unless the times are over 15 minutes, then it't time to go to stock and/or 75f

    Ilford Delta 400 in Kodak D-76 1:1
    [​IMG]
    largest tonal range image currently available
    negative scanned on canoscan 3000f taken with 18-55 vr dx at 18mm f3.5 on N75 with
    levels adjustment to move black from 0 to 60, first spot of black when moving slider and
    holding [alt]
    refer to this chart
    [​IMG]

    and this thread
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/...odak-t-max-400-35mm-t-max-d-76-developer.html
     
  8. jmolligo

    jmolligo Member

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    I guess you really can't go wrong with D-76 (plus it's good for such a wide range of films and dilutions).
     
  9. wclark5179

    wclark5179 Member

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    I've found that using empty 2 liter soda bottles work quite well. The plastic doesn't react with the chemicals and the cap seals real well keeping out the oxygen. I've used mt clear as well as green colored bottles. And they store quite easily in a cabinet under the sink in a bathroom I use for film developing. The empty bottles stack real nicely on side for future use and I keep those in the basement. I also cut the small strip of plastic that remains after removing the cap as I don't want stuff trapped between that piece and the bottle. I take the label off as well.

    Hope this method of storage may help you. The bottles take up little room.
     
  10. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    My $0.02. Unless you have a huge volume of film you plan on processing, I would one-shot your chemistry. Takes up WAY less space. 'Course, I'm operating within about 23 square feet. Talk about economy.
     
  11. jmolligo

    jmolligo Member

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    Thanks again for the further posts.

    I appreciate the storage tips (plus the soda bottles could be discarded and replaced easily enough when necessary).

    Also, I am leaning toward one shot developing - I think it does make the most sense when doing a small volume of processing.

    I appreciate all the advice - and I think it will help me improve my system greatly (I'm even giving a bit of thought of going to FP4+ or Delta as a main film, and using one of the Ilford developers in one shot).

    I'm working slowly and, considering as much as possible - as I want to try to set it up right the first time.
     
  12. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Get Serious!

    I got serious about saving space; single tray processing,
    one-shot chemistry, AND all chemistry Home Brew.
    Nothing left but the Wide Open Spaces.

    For good milage the chemistry is used at more than
    the usual dilution. Dan