Got darn film reels!

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by panchromatic, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. panchromatic

    panchromatic Member

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    heres my rant:

    So my whole life i've used metal reels in loading film. When I first started of course i would stick a few frames together (hey it happens the first time you start) Well for a while i was having the film developed at my work and now that i've finally got my darkroom working i've started heavily developing my own stuff (especally since i've experimented with different developers) Well with my own tank and reel i've been having a hell of a time getting the film on the reel. I figured i was just rusty, but i didn't get the hang of it and its really been ticking me off. I explored past forums and someone mentioned cheep and slightly bent reels can make it more difficult. So i borrowed a hewes (old heavy metal) from work and bam first time, no difficulty at ALL.

    man i'm so releaved... it was the reel not i.

    i'm done just needed to vent haha.
     
  2. rogueish

    rogueish Member

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    Understandable. Nothing much worse than thinking your doing something wrong when it's actually the tools with the problem. It's such a relief when you discover it really isn't you. (Usually it is me, but I like to blame my tools anyway :wink: ).
    Personally I use the cheap plastic, self feeding, ratchet style spools (got them as a Christmas present). Have used the ss spools a couple times. They do take a little practice having lost a couple frames from poor loading technics myself.
     
  3. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    I feel your pain. There is NOTHING worse than a bent SS reel (well, almost nothing). I prefer to use SS for 120 film, but for 35mm, I use plastic Paterson reels.
     
  4. NikoSperi

    NikoSperi Member

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    The hell there isn't: wet plastic reels and 120 roll film. :mad:
     
  5. garryl

    garryl Member

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    Obviously none of you have ever loaded one of those old Kodak tanks with the plastic lasagna aprons. :mad: :D
     
  6. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    Good point... Plastic reels and hair dryers - perfect together!
     
  7. bobfowler

    bobfowler Subscriber

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    I haven't touched one of those since 1972 - and that was when I was throwing it into the trash!
     
  8. mark

    mark Member

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    You are quite right garryl. Those things sucked.
     
  9. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    The aprons were AWESOME, easy to load and to process.
    I never had a kodak tank to go with them, but I had a small tin can, later a plastic can I painted black, where the 35mm aprons fit perfectly.


     
  10. panchromatic

    panchromatic Member

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    i used them once in high school for developing 120.... i didn't much care for them, they were easy to use (i thought) but i felt that i was cheating haha so i went to the metal reels.
     
  11. Bighead

    Bighead Member

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    See what you did?? You got all the old guys ranting now.........

    I went through the same thing. My metal reels got a little warped and started failing on me... Instead of buying Hewes reels, someone through a set of two plastic tanks. I'm not sold on plastic but they have been working great so far.... Easy to load too. And I can use the same stuff for 120 or 135...
     
  12. garryl

    garryl Member

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    Then I envy you.:sad: You must've had a magic touch. :wink: I could never get the film to track down the middle. :mad: Finally had to switch the SS. :D AH yes, memories of the 1959-60's middle school.:tongue:
     
  13. panchromatic

    panchromatic Member

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    :D :D I was born in 1985 my memories of high school is 1999-2003 :tongue:
     
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  15. garryl

    garryl Member

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    Young whipper snapper!! :D :D
     
  16. Ornello

    Ornello Inactive

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    Paterson all the way, baby!
     
  17. panchromatic

    panchromatic Member

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    haha yep.

    Its funny i'm in a local arts group in my area... there is a large amount of photographers (say 70% of the group) i'm the ONLY ONE who uses film. Though the majority of them at one point did but have since gone digital.
     
  18. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    You guys are such wimps. In the old days, we had to make our own tanks and reels out of stone, using stone tools and wooly elk antlers! :wink:
     
  19. garryl

    garryl Member

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    You mean that, in your younger days, when you developered film that you were stoned?:rolleyes:
     
  20. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    Stoned? Me? Although I must admit that memory of some parts of the '60s seems a little hazy. :wink:
     
  21. mark

    mark Member

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    You forgot to mention that your negs were coated on a dino-hide base that was prone to serious curling as it dried.
     
  22. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    Hewes reels are great. I recently bought some Kalt "High Grade" reels from B&H that are an economical alternative. They're a little more costly than the pre-bent off brands but they are true, straight and well made.

    It used to be the mark of a real photographer to be able to load a steel reel that was twisted into a pretzel shape and still never lose a frame. Thank God those days are gone!
     
  23. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    Just out of curiosity, how is that different from wet SS reels and 120 roll film.... :smile:



     
  24. mark

    mark Member

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    Thom. Those damned easy load plastic reels are impossible to load when they are wet. At least that has been my experience. The stainless ones load up easy because they do not rely on a ratchet motion to load the film, and the film does not slide along the runners. The film binds bad in a plastic reel as the emulsion gets wet and sticks to the plastic
     
  25. rhphoto

    rhphoto Member

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    Would you guys quit whining already?? I started in photography 25 years ago with a real camera (4x5), and sheet film. No friggin' holders to get frustrated over, just a lovely 15 minutes in absolute darkness sifting those SuperXX sheets through my fingers in the slippery soup. What a bunch of wimps!
     
  26. garryl

    garryl Member

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    You mean you never got to experience the Yankee sheet film slosh tank? Shame:wink:
    Also, back in the 70's, Honeywell-Nikor used to make a SS daylight reel and tank for 4x5 sheet film. :surprised: An back in the 30's, Kodak made a bakelite reel(?) and tank for daylight developing of 4x5(even came with an "easy Loader" device):rolleyes:

    Shame you missed out on all that historical frustration:D