Great news!

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by kjsphoto, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. kjsphoto

    kjsphoto Subscriber

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    Well I finally got the head back and it is working!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Now I have to still buy some paper and developer!

    DOH!

    How can you tell if HC110 is still good. Someone gave me a bottle of it and it doesn't look that old but I never used it but always wanted to. Also how do you mix 1 gallon of it? I have some 4x5 negs I want to develop. The negs are N, N+1 and N-1 so will HC110 be the choice??

    Oh yeah, again any more recommendations? The oriental paper seems to be out of stock and still clueless on developer.

    Also do I use the same fix as I use for film? For stop bath do you use water or an actual stop bath solution? If so what kind?

    I remember years ago we use to use Developer a stop bath ( chemical ) and a fixer then a 1 hour wash. But I do not remember what chemicals we used...


    Thanks again!!!

    Kev
     
  2. rogueish

    rogueish Member

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    I use the same stopbath (chem) and same fixer on my film and paper. I have also read that you can use film developer on paper but I have never tried it.
    Since you (and the supplier) are out of Oriental, get some Agfa FB paper, I doubt you'd be disappointed.
    Sorry can't help you with the HC110.
     
  3. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    Which dilution ratio are you going to use? I would use this developer as a one shot deal., if you mix the whole bottle as they would like (being the golden god) it will oxides quickly.

    You can use the same fixer type for both paper and film, altho , many use a different ratio for each; ;unless of course you are going to print to archival standards. Check Ilfords pdf files on their site for specifics.

    With regard to stop bath, there are mixed reviews on using stop bath for film, that decison can be influenced by the type of developer. Usually, a stop is used for paper unless you are using T-4 fixer which does not respond to an acid bath and needs running water.

    With fiber, washing is always longer, again check ilford for some guide lines for archival washing processes. However, it can be reduced by using HCA.
     
  4. lee

    lee Member

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    As Ann stated if you use HC110 as Kodak wants the developer will not last 6 months. I use a lot of HC110 and I generally use dil B. I make dil B by using one oz from the bottle and 31 oz of water. Stir well. That will make dil B. HC110 will last a long time if used this way. You don't state the brand or type of film you are planning to use. I would run some tests. As a starting place for Tri-x 6.50 minutes seems to be good at 68degrees f. good luck

    lee\c
     
  5. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Member

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  6. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    prepare your dilution and test the leader, note the time it takesw to become black.
    the development time should be about 5 times that
     
  7. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Kev,

    Several years ago I had the same question about an older partially filled bottle of HC-110 about 2 years old. I purchased a new bottle and processed two sheets of identically exposed Tri-X (I was making inter-positives for enlarged negatives) using the old and new developer at the same dilution and temp. I found virtually no difference in measured densities of the printed step wedges, less than 1/6 of a stop all across the scale.

    Since you are unfamiliar with the developer I would recommend purchasing a new jug and doing a comparitive test.

    As for stop bath, I use indicator stop for film or paper, I've never exhausted a batch of stop bath btw, but having using acid stop assures that development is terminated almost immediately and when processing paper it protects the fixer from alkaline carry over from the developer. In short I'm not a believer of water stops for film or paper. This includes use with staining film developers.

    I use film strength fixer for fixing paper. A single bath of rapid fix for 1 minute and one minute only. The paper is then placed in a tray of water for a brief rinse and then placed in another holding tray before treating in hypo clear or perma wash. This works with most papers but not all, such as AZO and Kodak's premium VC fiber base paper whose name I'm blanking on now (which is no longer made I think).

    Hope this helps,

    Don Bryant
     
  8. Donald Miller

    Donald Miller Member

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    Kev,

    As others have stated, the life of HC 110 is indefinite when kept as a concentrate and not mixed to a stock solution. You don't mention which film you are using. TriX will not expand much past N+1 with HC 110 even though that film/developer combination has been favored by many. Sometimes I find that I want more expansion then this combination offers. I have found other films that will expand more then that (Efke PL 100 and Tmax 400 as two). I don't use HC 110 currently. Preferring instead the Pyrocat formulation because of the proportional stain. The proportional stain gives better highlight tonal separation.

    B&H Photo in New York has both Graded and VC Oriental Paper in stock. Prices are reasonable.

    For stop bath, I mix 28 % acetic acid from glacial acetic acid. Then dilute from there. For film I mix stop bath at 1/4- 1/3 normal strength when I use Pyrocat or ABC Pyro developers for possible pinhole considerations. I use the normal dilution for paper.

    I mix all of my own chemicals from individual componants. I find that this requires a scale capable of measuring in grams and tenths of grams. The cost of chemicals is not great. This method gives me a greater sense of personal creative output. One more area where I have been directly involved in the production of the finished print. This may not make much sense to anyone else but it makes a great deal of difference to me.