Gum prints and acrylic paint

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by stephen_gray98, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. stephen_gray98

    stephen_gray98 Member

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    Hello all. Has anyone ever produced a gum print using acrylic paint instead of watercolour paint ? I've got some process colour acrylic and would like to give it a go.

    SPG
     
  2. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    I haven't personally but I know somone who does
    http://www.hands-on-pictures.com/Tutorials/Gum.html

    Hope it helps
    David
     
  3. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Terry King is the last person I would recommend for information.

    As for acrylic pigments you are much better off using watercolor paints.
     
  4. stephen_gray98

    stephen_gray98 Member

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    Any reason you wouldn't recommend Terry ?

    SPG
     
  5. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I too am curious if acrylics will work, particularly with carbon. For instance, Liquitex's acrylic Ink!

    Everyone knows that watercolors work well; why not explore other materials?
     
  6. donbga

    donbga Member

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    The question about acrylics comes up periodically and as I recall no has been too successful with them. You like to dabble Chris so go for it and let us know how it works.
     
  7. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    I don't dabble near as much as I babble... :wink:

    But perhaps you're right. My fear would be simply that the acrylics will harden completely and make the gum or carbon insoluble. An easy test would be to make an acrylic tissue, let it dry and run it under hot water. This, I could probably do quite easily.
     
  8. donbga

    donbga Member

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    Why bother when we know water color pigments work so well. If it ain't broke ..., I'm just sayin'
     
  9. GumPhoto

    GumPhoto Member

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    Acrylic paint is an integral component of the Temperaprint process. Temperaprint is a dichromated colloid process similar to gum, where the colloid happens to be egg whites. There are many examples available online. I've tried both temperaprint and gum with acrylic paint and I find them both lacking, but it is a matter of taste. For me, the opaque nature of the acrylic process limits what I feel to me a fundamental advantage of gum: the ability to allow colors to shine through subsequent layers. The result is a "poster-like" effect that CAN be very effective (and the online examples will demonstrate that). In my experience, edge effects are very difficult to bring off. as the acrylic paint seems to harden on its own in areas where one might expect it to be more soluble. The result is All-or-Nothing. There is no paint, or there is paint, but not the subtle variances that one gets with watercolor.

    If there is interest, I can post some examples of some (unsuccessful) attempts I have made with acrylic pigments and gum.

    Keith
     
  10. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    My interest in particular is [was] that this Ink! product has an ideal CMY set... [10 minutes go by] ...but I see now that the same pigments are available in Winsor & Newton's watercolors.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 26, 2011
  11. GumPhoto

    GumPhoto Member

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    And don't pick on Terry. He's been sick lately.
     
  12. dwross

    dwross Subscriber

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    I had very good luck with water soluble inks. http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-G-284-220

    I put them over a silver gelatin paper base, rather than bare paper, but they hardened up and acted just like watercolors in gum. I stopped using them because the colors are too bold for the look I want, but if bold and bright is a goal, these are the thing.
     
  13. wildbillbugman

    wildbillbugman Member

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    Isn't there such a thing as as a transparent acrylic? I dunno. I am asking because there are plenty of opaque watercolors.
    The derogatory comment about Terry was totaly inapropriate for any of the technical forums. If you absolutely must attack somene, please go to one of the general discussion forums at the bottom (apropriately) of the forum list.
    Bill
     
  14. GumPhoto

    GumPhoto Member

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    The comment regarding Terry was certainly not an attack.

    As for "transparent acrylic", I just viewed a youtube video featuring the Rowney brand of acrylic inks that shows it to be very transparent. I'll be trying this very soon.
     
  15. wildbillbugman

    wildbillbugman Member

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    I know that. I was reffering to the post you commented on
     
  16. GumPhoto

    GumPhoto Member

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    Well, I happen to like Terry a lot. I love his tenacity, his spirit, his work and his contribution to the field. That said, I have to say that I don't believe that Don was being derogatory in his statement. Nuff said.
     
  17. Hexavalent

    Hexavalent Subscriber

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    Although not exactly what the OP has proposed, some years ago, I did tinker with acrylics used a substitute for gum - not just as a pigment. I diluted the paint with acrylic medium to reduce the colour density, added dichro, allowed to dry, exposed and 'developed' as done with gum. It worked: not so wonderful for contones, but quite well for screened negatives (hard-dot). I found that exposure and development had to be done as soon as product was dry enough. Within a few hours, the acrylic becomes completely hardened and un-developable. It remains one of those "interesting experiments" that I've not revisited.
     
  18. GumPhoto

    GumPhoto Member

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    Really? You used only acrylic with dichro and NO added colloid? That's truly weird! But after consulting the google, I find

    "Organic Chemistry it is the branch of Chemistry that studies molecules with carbon atoms. Acrylic resins have the acryl functional group with structure H2C=CH-C(=O)-R derived from acrylic acid. Compounds containing an acryl group can be referred to as "acrylic compounds". Therefore, acrylic resins belong to this compounds' family."

    So I guess, you can say that acrylics ARE an "organic colloid"?

    So now I have something else I need to try! thanks!
     
  19. Hexavalent

    Hexavalent Subscriber

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    I've used Elmer's glue in a similar fashion - there is a variety (can't remember the exact name) that is designed for kids - it dries, but does not immediately harden (makes for easy-cleaning of spills etc,.). I will caution that clearing dichro stain from 'glue' emulsions is takes a lot of washing - a very sturdy support paper is needed.