Hasselblad 500cm VS Rollei 2.8

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by teepoe, Dec 23, 2011.

  1. teepoe

    teepoe Member

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    It seems to me that they are both around 1000 dollars US, and I am saving for a new MF camera. I got a Yashica 124 G to explore the medium and I love it. It's all I shoot anymore. So...time to make a big investment and get one of the classic heavy hitters. I will get a waist level finder with either and plan on using an 80mm 2.8 with the Hassy. I do a lot of shooting on the street and casually at parties and such. I have a meter, so I don't need a metered prism or one that works on the Rollei. Any tips before I blow a ton of cash on a camera that I hope to have for the rest of my life:D ??
     
  2. Hikari

    Hikari Member

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    The only camera you will ever need???

    The Rollei will be easier to handhold with slow shutter speeds as it has no moving mirror. You also don't get viewfinder blackout on the exposure. So it can be a great street/people/party camera. It is also lighter and smaller and quieter.

    The Hasselblad will allow you to change lenses for when you want a wide or telephoto. You can also get spare or different back for it.
     
  3. lesm

    lesm Member

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    If you're talking about at Rolleiflex, ie a TLR, then your commitment more or less stops at the first purchase, give or take an accessory or two. With the Hasselblad no doubt you'll be tempted to buy more lenses, more backs, more finders etc., all of which will cost you a fortune. So you'll need to take that into account as well as the respective costs of maintenance. Given the type of photography you do, if it were me I'd go for the Rollei.
     
  4. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    I don't think you will find much difference between the Yashica and Rollei TLR lenses. The reason to get the Rollei would be:
    1) More rugged, more metal, less plastic (heavier though)
    2) Accepts prism
    3) Rolleifix makes it much easier to get on a tripod. 124G's feet make tripod mount difficult or dangerous.
    4) Focus screens interchange much easier
    5) Accepts glass panel if you want (but you probably won't want it)
    6) Nice pistol grip, also mounts various brackets for flash
    7) You can focus when using the sports finder
    8) Cool DOF indicator (F series)
    9) Multi exposure capacity
    10) Accepts rolleikin (35mm film)
    11) Optional rangefinder for the sports finder (Rolleimeter)
    12) Strap comes on and off easier
    13) Spool locking knobs don't have to be twisted to stay out for loading/unloading
    14) Automatic film-start sensing
    15) Incident diffuser option on meter

    If you don't need any of that stuff, just stay with the Yashica.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2011
  5. piu58

    piu58 Member

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    ...
    16 ) More lenses available (Mutar 0.7 and 1.5)
    17) Close up lenses available which correct parallax
    18) The Planar lens is sharper when wide open
    19) It is possible to buy new (not used) filters for it
     
  6. John Austin

    John Austin Member

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    Let your fingers do the thinking

    It is very much a matter of feel, I grew up with Rolleis, 80, 55, 135mm lenses and still have them and they are not for sale

    For commercial studio work where 5x4" was too slow I bought a Hasselblad kit, followed by lots of "I need" lenses, ext'n tubes, viewfinders etc all of which were very not cheap in those days - The whole lot, including my SWC is now up for sale - The Rolleis never

    I recommend the Rollei, but that is personal and many would suggest the Hbd - Feel them both and give the matter serious consideration before you spend your money
     
  7. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    Rollei.

    But it really depends, SLR vs TLR is a very personal. You arleady have a TLR so maybe you should try an MF SLR next, like a Bronica SQ. Not as nice as a Hasselblad but they're dirt cheap in comparison. I just got a kit that came with 2 lenses, 2 backs, a WLF, a prism finder, pistal grip, and some other misc items for $370/shipped. I got it because I wanted to try a MF SLR before commiting myself to a 'Blad.

    I like TLRs and SLRs, but I think I prefer TLRs, so my next camera is probably going to be a Rollei.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 24, 2011
  8. PaulMD

    PaulMD Member

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    Assuming you already have used both a SLR and a TLR (your 124g), if you like the TLR, get the TLR. It's all about what works for you. TLRs make great party cameras - 2.8 is fast, the TLR is stable (i.e. slow shutter speeds possible), and people relax a lot more around TLRs vs SLRs.

    Of course, IMO the SLR is a better general purpose camera, but if you like a TLR get what you like, otherwise you'll regret it. Both have excellent glass.
     
  9. chriscrawfordphoto

    chriscrawfordphoto Subscriber

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    I went Hasselblad because I need different lenses for my architectural and landscape work. If an 80mm is all you'll ever need, a Rollei is better because its lighter, easier to focus (my opinion), and easier to handhold. Rollei did make a wide version with a 50mm lens and a tele version with a 135mm lens, but they're rare and VERY expensive...much more so than the equivilent lenses for a Hasselblad.
     
  10. elekm

    elekm Member

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    I think it might also come down to portability vs. flexibility. The Hasselblad will offer more flexibility, while the Rolleiflex will offer portability. The 2.8 Rolleiflex is not a lightweight camera, but you also don't have the isssue of backs and lenses.

    And I agree with others who say to try both the Hasselblad, if you can, because you'll know rather quickly if it "feels right" in your hands.

    My personal thoughts are that while I love a TLR, there's nothing like an interchangeable lens system. I have the big Rolleiflex SL 66.
     
  11. philbed

    philbed Subscriber

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    Well, my 2 cents. I have a Bronica SQ, a Yashica 124 G and a Rolleiflex T. I am selling the Bronica. Yes, it's a very good system but as I also shoot 4x5, the Bronica needs a tripod outdoor and not so easy to use. I prefer TLR medium camera. I can shoot documentary street view, landscape, portrait and so on. It's for me more on 35mm side. Bronica and Hassy(I had one long ago) are more on large format side for my photgraphy practice. For the lens quality, I suppose that the Planar are better corner cripness than the Tessar formula lens of the Yashica or the Rollei T but I prefer spend my money in film and paper than in overestimated body camera.
     
  12. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

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    People react differently to different cameras. TLRs seem to get ignored or smiles. SLRs are more noticed, sometimes more threatening, sometimes confused for video cameras these days. The important thing, as mentioned again and gain, is your comfort, though. If the Yashica is doing it for you, and all you want is a slightly better lens and a more solid mechanism in the same form, Rollei it is.

    By the way, look hard at the f/3.5 Rollei Planars or Xenotars. That half stop loses you little in practical use. I have a 2.8C, and I can't remember the last time I used f/2.8. The 3.5s are cheaper, the lens is as good. And to save more money, go for the Xenotar- 'the same' quality (some will debate) but less status and hence less money. An E series is also a bit cheaper than an F series with little or no lose.

    For either Hassy or Rollei, condition is as important as anything else. Look into maintenance needs and what an overhaul can cost and include that number in your figuring.
     
  13. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    well, I gotta say--been using the hasselblad for years...then I got, on a whim, a yashica tlr----that yashica is the BEST for carrying around no question about it--get some close up adapters and you're in business...the only way you suffer is in the slight perspective error that cannot be fixed with the parallex correcting closeup adapters---but you compensate and it's worth the tradeoffs--you wanna travel..that's the one to take.

    don't get the rollei--get an old yashicamat and try it out....works? want sharper? THEN buy the rollei...but the yashica in the streets is more comfortable--you don't mind taking it out or getting it splashed or somethign...I had a rollei, I'd think twice or keep it in a case to keep it safe---and miss shots, you know? You'll use (at least I do) a yashicamat...and end up with more shots.

    hassel is for studio in my opinion--I've handheld it for years but after owning a yashicamat for a year, it is racking up a decent percentage of shots...of course now that I'm using bigger stuff inside, the hassel is on ignore list for temporary.....

    but try it out cheaply...get the 80mm yashinon lens

    OH--get a 24 too!!!! yashica 24 does roll 120 film!!!! and they have yashinons...get it cheap if the meter is dead (which it will be).....
     
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  15. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    The Hassy can be pricey, The Rollei is more handholdabe

    Jeff
     
  16. jelke

    jelke Member

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    rollei..., look at the work of http://www.vivianmaier.com/ she also used a rollei, i worked for years with a rollei but now i work with hasselblad, i love the 120mm macro and 250mm, the photo's i make with these lenses i can't make with the rollei, hasselblad and rollei are two different unique camera's,
     
  17. echoism

    echoism Member

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    I don't have any experience with the Rollei, since I'm not a huge TLR fan, but once you get used to the Hassy I find it's easy enough to use for everyday use, and I generally use it for snapshots of my friends, out on the street, etc. I rarely get comments about the camera if people notice it at all, and usually ambient noise is so loud the mirror slap isn't an issue. If people do pay attention to it, I use it to my advantage to get a nice posed picture or people ignore it after the first one or two shots.
     
  18. John Austin

    John Austin Member

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    What I like about this thread is that I suddenly discover I am not the last grumpy old man who likes his Rolleis - Makes me feel good on Christmas morning

    My favourite is my Widie, 55mm for a 120 format snapshot camera is perfect - Mine is battered by years of use but still works beautifully - When I was a young press photographer for a small newspaper several photographers started using Yashicas and threw them away every year for a new one, like Ford cars - Those of us who used Rolleis kept them working forever, like Volvos
     
  19. John R.

    John R. Member

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    Well, I think this is like comparing apples to oranges. The only common denominator between the two cameras is the film size.
    So, is it the medium of 120 you love or the twin lens you love? You first should decide if you simply prefer a TLR or SLR design in the tool you wish to use. As others have noted, one is a basic high quality camera with a couple of accessories and the other is a major system of components. That's a huge difference! If you are only going to be using an 80mm and taking casual street shots and a candid portrait or two then the Rollei would be a nice choice. But, if you want your investment to be diverse in it's abilities to meet your present and future needs then there is no question Hasselblad or Rollei SLR is the way to go.

    I disagree with others regarding the Rollei lenses however. If you go Rollei TLR track down the 2.8 Planar and shoot it wide open for some beautiful portrait results and the speed and simplicity of use can be a nice advantage at times. But, I find the Hasselblad with Acute-Matte split image screen (like the 42170) faster to focus and properly frame. I own a Rolleiflex 2.8 Planar and a couple Blads with a lens inventory from 50 to 500 and I can tell you that in virtually most cases the Hasselblad is what I reach for first. Rollei is in it's display case adorned with it's mirrored lens cap which is gorgeous to look at. But, at the same time I have made some outstanding images with the Rollei and I also just enjoy using it, but it simply does not have the system diversity that is very important to me. You can't go wrong with either camera, both are beautiful photographic tools that anyone would be very satisfied to own and use. It's really just a matter of diversity and feel between the two. Good luck with your decision.
     
  20. teepoe

    teepoe Member

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    Wow. such good advice and stuff to think about. This far exceeds my expectation for this humble thread:smile: It sounds like maybe the Rollei will fit my needs better, but I am gonna try and borrow a Hassy from a friend and shoot a few rolls to get a feel for it before I decide. Cheers, everyone!
     
  21. MDR

    MDR Member

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    Trying the Hassy is a good decision in fact try to handle as many different cameras as possible maybe you'll feel more comfortable with another camera say a Rollei Slr,Bronica or a Mamiya, etc.. the feel is more important than some supposed mystical qualities that some cameras have.

    Good Luck

    Dominik
     
  22. DaveO

    DaveO Member

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    One thing you can do with the Rolleiflex when you go to a parade or are in a crowd, is hold it over your head and look up into the finder and take a picture. You can't do that with the Hassy. I believe it was designed to do this so that in trench warfare in WWI you would only expose your arms to take a picture instead of your upper body.

    DaveO
     
  23. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    Why not?

    Actually, I've done it many times with both.
     
  24. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

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    "Rollei is a German manufacturer of optical goods founded in 1920 by Paul Franke and Reinhold Heidecke in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony..."
    "...1928 saw the production of the first ten prototypes of the legendary twin-lens Rolleiflex..."

    "...World War I was a major war centred in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918..."

    Maybe another manufacturer was using the periscope idea during the Great War?
     
  25. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    If your subject area is parties , you will be not comfortable with twin lens. At close range , what you see is not what you get.
    Other matter , Rollei stopped its production , no more parts available. You will be needed to pay great or will not be possible to new parts.
    If you are in crowded club and drop the camera , you can build the hasselblad from components one by one but rollei goes to trash.

    Umut
     
  26. DaveO

    DaveO Member

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    I just looked up tlr's on Wikipedia. Rollei was in the 1920's but twin lens reflexes date back to 1870. It may not be a Rollei but an un-named TLR'.

    DaveO