hasselblad lenses are pretty flare resistant, right?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by msbarnes, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    JUST making sure.

    I was never really bothered by flare but then I did a shoot at the beach with my 2.8E (single-coated, and with a hood) and it flared under not-the-easiest lighting situations. It wasn't really THAT bad but I sometimes think about getting a Hasselblad for situations like this (beach and snow scenes).

    I'm interested in the 60-120 lenses mostly. I read that the Planar design isn't really a flare-fighter but with multi-coating...maybe it is? I'd
     
  2. jp498

    jp498 Member

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    I don't know what's made for Hasselblad, but you can't go wrong with a tessar or triplet in regards to flare as there are fewer glass-air interfaces to cause reflection. Single coated is plenty for those lenses. A triplet isn't going to be as sharp, and a tessar probably won't be 2.8 and if it were, it wouldn't be crisp at the edges wide open, but stopped down it's great.
     
  3. LiamG

    LiamG Member

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    This is one of the reasons the Tessar (1902) was considered an improvement on the Planar (1896) in the era of poor coatings.
     
  4. Slixtiesix

    Slixtiesix Subscriber

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    My Rolleiflex T is also very prone to flare if the sun hits the front lens, though it has a Tessar. From my experience, the only thing that will reduce flare dramatically is a good shade. Some years ago I´ve made a "scientific" test on slide film, using some of my Rollei lenses, single- and multicoated, with and without shades, while the sun was shining on the front lenses in a 45° angle. The result was the following: Multicoating did not really improve resistance to flare by much. Neither did the original lens shade for the 80mm Planar, though it did help a little. The by far best result was with the 250mm lens, compendium shade and mask for this lens.
    I think a Hasselblad will be more flare-resistant than a Rollei TLR, but only because there are larger shades available. The 100-250mm shade is quite large. I think a 100/3,5 CF together with this shade will reduce flare in your pictures a lot. But when used without a shade, I don´t think there will be an overwhelming difference to the Rollei. Problem with TLRs is that you can´t use huge shades since they would interfere with the viewing lens. The zoom you mentioned can only be used with the 200 or 2000 Series, but from what I´ve read, it is pretty good.
     
  5. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    Here is a sample of flare,

    [​IMG]
    Untitled by Michael_Sergio_Barnes, on Flickr


    I expected this and it really isn't really THAT bad but I'm wondering if a Hasselblad 80mm/100mm would eliminate this. The newer Rolleiflex's (GX, FN, I think that they are called) are just too expensive. But I also have an MX-EVS and I might test that for the heck of it since I own one. I don't need an f2.8 for situations like this.
     
  6. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Hi Michael, yeah a Hassy might do a little better but its not so bad as is. Plus a Hassy handheld under those circumstances may have not been as sharp due to camera shake and mirror slap, or may have required a faster shutter speed and/or faster film. The Rolleiflexes and their quiet and so smooth leaf shutter are so great for that kind of shooting you did there. So it's a give and take. Wonderful set, lovely woman.
     
  7. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    My CF 150 flares some. The 80/2.8 CF doesn't.
     
  8. noacronym

    noacronym Member

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    Nice shot. Where I live, you would have needed a Hasselblad SWC to photgraph the women.
     
  9. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    I've never had a Hasselblad 80 or 150 flare like that, but I always use a lens hood.
     
  10. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    If you shoot in conditions like this frequently, get a Hasselblad pro lens shade, one of the bellows models.
     
  11. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    Thank you for your compliments! I agree with you completely in the virtues of the flex and I wouldn't put down my Rolleiflex after this shoot. I like to travel light, camera-wise, and I did two shoots on a trip home in completely different lighting. My next shoot was under very poor lighting and I was forced to shoot under 1/8 - 1/15 shutter speeds and most of them turned out pretty good (camera-shake wise).

    [​IMG]
    Untitled by Michael_Sergio_Barnes, on Flickr

    I'm in no rush to get a Hassy, but I just wanted to know it's flare-fighting reputation for the focal lengths that I'm considering. It sounds that if I do get a Hassy that I'm better off going pro-shade?
     
  12. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Multicoating can't fix that sort of veiling flare from oblique light because it's due to the light hitting the inside surfaces of the lens and camera bodies and then bouncing around. It's mostly not from the glass or glass surfaces.
     
  13. John Wiegerink

    John Wiegerink Member

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    I have older "chrome" 50mm, 80mm 150mm Hassy lenses and they all seem pretty good, but a shade is always on them, even indoors. One of the more problem Hasselblad lenses for me is my 38mm Biogon on my SWC and a proper hood isn't a ton of help. This lens certainly improves with the "T" coating I think, because of all the elements and the design curves of those elements. Just my opinion of course. JohnW
     
  14. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Are your lenses clean? I mean really clean, no trace of haze inside? Check for this by shining a bright light through the lens with the shutter and aperture wide open. Just a little haze can exacerbate flare.
     
  15. Douglas Fairbank

    Douglas Fairbank Member

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    I dont see anybody mention the difference made by modern paints and lightproofing. Even with the Hasselblad T* optics the later lenses were markedly better because of improved paints and shutter and iris blade coatings. Big changes were made just before the introduction of the CF range and is has never stopped and never will so long as new materials continue to be invented. H camera lenses have carbon fibre shutter blades for example.
     
  16. Noble

    Noble Member

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    I am not sure what you are referring to as "hasselblad lenses." If you mean Zeiss lenses for medium format SLRs then you can buy them for a number of systems. I'm more familiar with the offerings for the Rollei 6000 series medium format SLRs. As others have said though they aren't magical. There is no substitute for a good lens hood and paying attention to where your light source is. Even with Zeiss glass and a OEM lens hood I still hide my camera behind tree trunks or poles to protect it from oblique sunlight.
     
  17. msbarnes

    msbarnes Member

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    I'm specifically referring to the Zeiss CF lenses made for the 500 series; that is what I meant by Hasselblad lenses, and I think that most people understood that as well.

    I understand that you have to pay attention to the light source and everything but some lenses do handle those situations better than others. I usually don't shoot into the sun / bright sources but sometimes, I kind of want to.
     
  18. cjbecker

    cjbecker Member

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    I've had to get a proshade becuase of a few flare issues from using the plastic hoods.
     
  19. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I have not had flare problems with the Hasselblad T* CF lenses including the 903 SWC 38mm lens
     
  20. Noble

    Noble Member

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    Is there any optical improvement between the Zeiss CF lenses and other "late" model Zeiss lenses in different mounts?
     
  21. Slixtiesix

    Slixtiesix Subscriber

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    Mostly not. The CFi update was merely a barrel redesign. Only the 40/4 IF that was released in 2003 was a complete new design.
    The 50/4 was redesigned slightly somewhen in the 80s and floating elements were added. The 38mm Biogon was recomputed around 2000 for the 905 series because they had to refrain from using lead, but this did not result in a real optical improvement. All other lenses (30mm, 60mm, 80mm, 100mm, 120mm, 150mm, 180mm, 250mm, Superachromats) are optically identical in their CF and CFi/CFE incarnation.