have a question on film storage

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Bobby L., Apr 10, 2008.

  1. Bobby L.

    Bobby L. Member

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    what is good to store film, in the refridgerator or freezer, because I like to start stocking up on 35mm film. But not sure how to cold storage the film. If the fridge is used how long should I wait for the roll come up to room temp, and pretty much the same for freezer if that is suggested.
     
  2. Bobby L.

    Bobby L. Member

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    just realize the typo in the subject line, with the word have
     
  3. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    Freeze it in original container.
     
  4. panastasia

    panastasia Member

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    Freeze it, and allow at least 2 hours for warm-up before opening.
     
  5. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear Bobby,

    I use a mini fridge so film goes in both the refrigeration and freezer compartments just because of the room needed. I solve the warm up problem by always having a few rolls at room temperature. On grand occasion, I will take a 35mm roll right from the fridge or freezer and warm it up on a heat register or hair dryer (carefully, still in the box, or at least the plastic container). Remember to shoot fast film as fresh as possible unless you are going for the big grain look.

    Neal Wydra
     
  6. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    Note that refrigerating or freezing film will help it last longer, but not indefinitely. Once manufactured, film is slowly fogged by cosmic rays even when frozen. This effect is more pronounced for fast films than for slow films. Thus, I wouldn't recommend stocking up on fast film just for the heck of it; but if you see a bargain or hear that your favorite film has been discontinued, by all means buy it and freeze it, particularly if it's a slow film.
     
  7. panastasia

    panastasia Member

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    I too, believe this is true, but have know idea how long it would take. It's those damn neutrinos! I've heard that they can pass through miles of lead, or anything, even planets - no stopping them.
     
  8. Bobby L.

    Bobby L. Member

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    k thanxs for the info. as far as film speed, right now I'm working with 100 and 400. maybe one day I'll shoot a roll of high speed. I have 9 rolls on the way now, and planning on using most of them at the kentucky derby festival balloon glow on april 25. But I do want to stock up a little bit on films so that I can have it on hand when I need it.
     
  9. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    Actually, it's gamma radiation that's the problem. The neutrinos don't cause measurable harm. You can store film deep underground for many years.

    It doesn't take all that long, unfortunately. Faster films (ISO 800 and faster) will show the effects in a year or two. Slower films show the damage more slowly. Very slow films (50 and less) may take many years to show any damage.
     
  10. milkplus-mesto

    milkplus-mesto Member

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    hmm, metres of lead seems to be a convenient way of stopping the gamma radiation.

    but if i've got film lying around, would I be better off keeping it out or in the freezer or fridge?
     
  11. GeoffHill

    GeoffHill Member

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    For normal B&W and colour films, the cooler the better, so shove it in the deep freeze in its origional packaging if you intend stocking up. For only 9 films, if you are only keeping them for a month or 2 and intend shooting them soon, then just put them in the fridge
     
  12. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    I don't think metres of lead will do the job. You need tens of metres.

    This is why using hundreds of metres of rock is a lot easier.
     
  13. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    If you have 9 rolls of consumer film you'll be shooting in a month it probably won't matter. Cold storage stops long term emulsion deterioration (2 years past expiration date stuff) and not fogging. Over a month it will probably be useless.

    PS. Just shoot 25 speed films and you'll be all set.