haze on lens?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Rinthe, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. Rinthe

    Rinthe Member

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  2. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    I see two lights falling on the glass. I would venture, in absence of physical inspection, that the 'haze' to which you refer is a whole bunch of electrons bouncin' all around down in there. Again, without the lens in hand and by that illustration, there's know way to determine fungus, moisture, bad cement, or whatever else it could conceivably be.
     
  3. elekm

    elekm Member

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    I vote for bouncing electrons. Seriously though, I agree with Christopher that it's difficult to tell from a photo. You usually just have to buy it and cross your fingers.
     
  4. Rinthe

    Rinthe Member

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    not talking about the lights. on the left side of the lens, you can see the 'haze' im talking about.
     
  5. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Possibly cement or coating flaking off.
     
  6. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Actually, I would vote for photons, rather than electrons.

    Otherwise, I agree fully.
     
  7. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Geez, Matt. Well, um, duh, you're right. Stupid keys.

    As to the discoloration on the left, I would vote for coating that has not been rubbed off yet. That, in and of itself, shouldn't affect image quality.
     
  8. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Wow. Did I really say Electrons? And did Mike really not catch that? ;p Sorry, I like company under that bus. Nice tranny.
     
  9. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    There's some sort of crud visible at the edge of the front element from roughly 6 o'clock to 9 o'clock. Might be oil, might be coating damage. If oil, a microfiber cloth and Super Kote or maybe R.O.R. lens cleaning fluid might remove it. If coating damage, negligible.

    I can't tell what's going on with the rear element's outer surface. Whoever took the pictures want to learn how to photograph lenses.

    If the lens' price is low enough, gamble. If too high or you're very risk averse, don't get it. It is, though, much cleaner than most of the ones I've seen on offer.
     
  10. Tony D

    Tony D Member

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  11. Dan Fromm

    Dan Fromm Member

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    Not fogging. Lens elements made of thoriated glass eventually yellow. They're still clear. The yellowing can be removed by letting the lens bask for a while, sometimes a long while, under a UV lamp.

    Aero Ektars aren't the only lenses that contain radioactive elements. I've cleared three TTH tessar type process lenses and one Repro Claron with a compact 20w UV-B fluorescent. The process took nearly a month with that dim little bulb. Some people have reported quicker clearing by setting lenses to bask in the sun. I was reluctant to do that because of the crud that falls from the sky.