HC-110 Foamy?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by RattyMouse, Mar 9, 2014.

  1. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    My last few runs with HC-110 showed a significant amount of foam once I opened up the tank to pour out the developer. I'm curious to know if that's normal. Any other users report seeing foam after all your agitation? This is with just dilution B in the tank and nothing else (aside from film; HP5).

    I wash my Patersen tanks until the rinse water does not foam at all so I'm pretty sure that there is no soap residue left over from the cleaning stage of the last development run.

    Thanks!
     
  2. erikg

    erikg Member

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    Films such as HP-5 have incorporated surfactants, probably to aid in more even development. That is probably what you are seeing. I've seen a bit of that as well.
     
  3. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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  4. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    Yes, I get this as well. With APH09 a little, HC110 more. So I would say it is normal, I never noticed any influence on development.
     
  5. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    Ah, that must be it. I dont recall seeing foam when I ran Delta 3200 through HC-110. Thanks!
     
  6. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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  7. erikg

    erikg Member

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    Right. The photo-flo theory is good except for those who don't use it. You could try this experiment: place the empty reels in the tank and fill with water, agitate and then check for foaming, if so wetting agent in tank and reels is likely fault. If not mix some HC110 and repeat the test using the developer instead of water. If yes then it's likely the HC110. If no then try with a roll of film in the tank, develop as normal, no presoak. If yes the film is the likely source.
    Nothing to be concerned about in that case.
     
  8. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I'b be willing to bet that all developers will exhibit foam if agitation is vigorous and there is at least some space above the fluid in the tank.

    As long as there is enough fluid in the tank, it probably doesn't matter.

    Although if a developer is particularly susceptible to oxidation, it would probably be wise to temper the activity of the agitation.
     
  9. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Photo-Flo contains an anti-foaming agent.
     
  10. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    The question that you really want to ask is: Does it matter that you get foam in the tank?

    I have seen plenty of negatives where air bubbles prevent fresh developer from reaching the film, leaving portions of the negative less developed than other areas. This is usually around the edges of the film where it gets stuck between the reel and two 'walls' of film.

    If you rap your tank firmly on the counter top before you set the tank to rest between agitation cycles, you will not have any problems from this foaming.

    The foaming is one of those things that people get puzzled about, and ask questions, without really thinking whether it matters or not. Kind of like the pink stain of some films doesn't affect printing in a way that can actually be quantified, but people still feel like there's a great need to get rid of it.

    Process your film and look at the negatives. If the negatives are good - what difference does it make that the developer foams?
     
  11. erikg

    erikg Member

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    It still foams. A lot.
     
  12. erikg

    erikg Member

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    Nothing wrong with being curious. Nobody said anything about it being a problem.
     
  13. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    I've spent, sadly, the bulk of my 20 year career fighting foam in emulsion chemistry. I find foam to be a fascinating subject for sure.
     
  14. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Kodak's recommendation is for far more Photo-Flo than is needed. You only need just enough to break down the surface tension of the water. This amounts to 2-3 drops per 250 ml of solution. Much less foaming at this concentration.
     
  15. George Collier

    George Collier Member

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    I've had foam pour out with HC110 with Ilford films, but not Kodak Tri-x, and Photo flo never touches my developing gear. Doesn't seem to be a problem, though.