Hello and Daytime long exposures black and white

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by David Hatton, Feb 19, 2011.

  1. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    Hello all,
    I'm a long time lurker from the U.K. and West Turkey so, hi.
    I have just acquired a pentax 67ii and I love it! I was wondering what a typical set up would be for long exposures - during the day. I would be obliged for any help.
    I have a sturdy tripod, cable releases etc but was wondering about the camera set-up really for this type of exposure.
    Thanks:confused:
     
  2. likemarlonbrando

    likemarlonbrando Member

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    you would need a strong neutral density filter would help. and small apertures.
     
  3. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    Sorry , I should have mentioned that I use FP4+ film, developer is prescysol ef and I don't want to use nd filters :smile:
     
  4. paul_c5x4

    paul_c5x4 Subscriber

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    Pin hole and/or one of these --> Welding Glass, but that has the same effect as an ND filter..
     
  5. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    As mention before, use small apertures. You could look into some B&W filters, yellow, orange,red, etc.

    Jeff
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Daytime long exposure is an oxymoron here in Turkey :D It's relatively easy in the UK :smile:

    Turkey it'd either be an ND filter or Pan F in Perceptol - because that's a developer that needs reduced film speed, FP4 is Sunny 16 + a bit. As you know I work hand held 1/125th @f22 with Delta 100 and that's with 5x4, a Pentax 67 lens is probably better at f16.

    I do have a Notion . . . . . . . . . . negative/print that was a 30 second exposure, you saw me take it :D It means working first light or dusk, or an ND filter.

    UK then there's no issues getting film, so Pan F & 25 EI will mean longer exposures are easy, but I never find it an issue with 100 ISO emulsions, except the handful of really good summer days.

    Ian
     
  7. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    Hi Ian,
    I'm in the Uk a the moment. I've had a look at ND filters and they are EXTORTIONATE! Pan F may do it for me if I use it early morning or early evening. What about development? Is prescysol OK for that film? I had a look at the welding glass mentioned by Paul (many thanks Paul) but I think I'd need a ampere conversion chart :smile:
     
  8. olwick

    olwick Member

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    Use a 10 stop ND filter such as the Lee Big Stopper or the B+W version. There are apps that allow you to calculate the exposure too if you want quick and easy exposure info. Just meter normally, add the filter, adjust exposure and away you go. Very simple actually.
     
  9. mickster

    mickster Member

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    Not sure why you don't want to use ND filters if they would give you the times you're after. You can get them cheap from 7dayshop.com if yr in the UK.

    Otherwise, in addition to using slow film and small apertures as suggested above, use reciprocity failure to your advantage. Pick a film with poor reciprocity characteristics (Ilford's FP4 or Delta 100 for instance), and these will help you get longer times. Steer clear of Fuji Neopan 100.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 20, 2011
  10. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    mirror lock up -- to reduce vibration
     
  11. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Prescysol or Pyrocat HD will be fine.

    Look for the Coking ND filters, or try SRB Griturn.

    Ian
     
  12. stillsilver

    stillsilver Member

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    PanF+ (rated @ 25), Perceptol, and ND filters.

    Mike
     
  13. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    You can try using a slow IR film like IR820 with an R72 filter, which will give you EI1 in Sunny-16 light (that's a 2s exposure at f/22 in the noonday sun!) and probably slower still with clouds.

    Edit: you can also use a slow film like Adox CHS25 (Efke-25) at EI16, slap on a Red-25 for about 3.5 stops and then a CPL for 1.5 more stops, which gives you about EI0.5, or 4s at f/22 in full sun, probably more like 8s with reciprocity failure. Much, much longer under clouds.
     
  14. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    Hi,
    The reason I don't want to use ND filters is twofold. firstly there is the cost, which can be phenominal! Second, I don't like the idea of putting a piece of glass/plastic in front of a good lens.
    I use fp4 as my standard film but I'm advised by others to use panf - a much slower film. What to do, what to do?:confused::blink:
     
  15. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    Thanks Ian. I looked at several posts here and other places on the internet and it seems that panf can be really fussy and grainy. Any thoughts?:smile:
     
  16. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Pan F can never be grainy it's too inherently fine grained, but if you drop the box speed and compensate bu cutting the dev time then it's easy to control the contrast.

    I've 6 rolls sat ready for testing but until I use them I can't really recommend a dev time. Delta 100 is another good choice but a stop faster.

    Ian
     
  17. paul_c5x4

    paul_c5x4 Subscriber

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    The last time I used PanF+, I rated it at E.I.25 and developed in D76 @ 1+3 - In 120, grain was difficult to see. I would suggest getting a couple of rolls and trying it.
     
  18. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Pan-F is not grainy. It is the antithesis of grainy. I mean, it is a film and it has grain, but it's very fine and certainly finer than FP4. I've got prints from Pan-F that are about 30" on a side from 6x7 (enlargement of 11x) and you can barely see the grain on close inspection. Acros has similarly fine, low-contrast grain but it's about 1.5 stops faster.

    Pan-F is by default quite contrasty but everyone here is suggesting you pull it a stop, which will mean you get fairly normal contrast.

    You need to give up on your choice of film or your refusal to use filters or both. One way or another, if you want a long exposure, you need to reduce the amount of light getting into the camera and reduce the film's sensitivity to that light. You can get perfectly good filters in the $25-50 range that will not harm your image quality (you will not be able to tell the difference in a blind comparison) except in cases of extreme dynamic range where they can cause flare. By using an older style emulsion, you can also take advantage of reciprocity failure; Pan-F does it to an extent but the Adox films are much more dramatic.
     
  19. David Hatton

    David Hatton Member

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    Thanks for your reply and thanks to everyone who responded. I think you're right. I've found some cheap ND filters at the websites suggested and I'm going to run a few rolls of PanF through the camera and see what happens.
    Cheers All
    David
     
  20. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    You could also consider a Polarizer or red #25 filter and I seriously doubt you will suffer any image degradation.

    I saw a guy on the web (from Eastern Europe I think) that would do daytime long exposures from a tripod and then would pick up the tripod for movement toward the end of the exposure. He achieved brilliant abstract architecture/street scenes with a mix of sharp elements & movement/blur.

    Does anyone remember who I'm referring to? There was a short vid on the web showing him work.
     
  21. SteveR

    SteveR Member

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    Or try to find something even slower... I don't know if there are any current productions around, but I have a good stash of Ilford Micro-Neg pan that I love for long daytime exposures. Originally an iso6 film, my stash is getting quite old (40+ years) and now measures an iso of 2, while still holding full contrast. On a bright sunny day here in Australia that gives me about a 2 second exposure at f32, 4-5 seconds with a coloured filter. ...if only it was still regularly available!