Help identifying filter

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by pstake, Jun 8, 2013.

  1. pstake

    pstake Member

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    I got this with a box of Retina-related stuff. It looks new. I've googled like mad but can't come up with a definitive answer. I'm really hoping it's a skylight filter because the skylight I have in 29.5, has some weird white junk growing around the edge of it, where the glass meets the mount.

    EDIT: It reads: 042 T-filter f.K.-film

    So ... can anyone tell me what this filter is for?

    Is it a skylight? Or is it maybe a 085 for color film?

    Any help is appreciated!

    IMG_0270.jpg

    IMG_0269.jpg

    IMG_0272.jpg
     
  2. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    Its a color warming filter for really dreary blue days. IMO
     
  3. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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    Looks pretty dark to be a skylight, but that could be my screen. It looks more like a filter to use tungsten film in daylight. B&W might have the nomenclature on their website.
     
  4. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

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    You know something?--I think von Hoegh is right.
     
  5. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Thanks, everyone. I thought it might be an 85 variant.
     
  6. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Ian C.,

    This is what the skylight filter I have, looks like.

    I'm about ready to throw it in the trash. Looks like possibly fungus. Even if it's separation , the filter is no good IMHO.

    photo (2).JPG
     
  7. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    The B+W booklet shows a 040 as yellow-orange and 041 as red-orange.
    Estimating by the way their catalog numbers run, the 042 is definitely a black and white filter. 0xx is the only series listed as for black & white.
    B+W will sometimes drop numbers from the catalog I suppose from lack of customer demand, especially when the differences are slight.
    If you wish to call, Schneider technicians have older references on hand and have helped me out from time to time finding older numbers,

    Color correction filters are either KR or KB. KR=red, KB=blue
     
  8. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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    Pulled out the Kodak Filters book to see if I could figure it out. It's not a Kodak number. But suppose 042 could be a mired-shift value... Then this might be what you would use to color correct Type A or B film to foil-filled flashbulb...
     
  9. AgX

    AgX Member

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    A "T" filter would be one out of three primaries seperation filters, with that T refering to daylight lighting and "42" meaning red.
    "K-Film" means Tungsten-film.

    However your filter still seems quite pale for that.
     
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  10. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Interesting. I thought it looked a little pale to be an 85a/b but certainly darker than a skylight 1a. Close to a 1b but maybe a bit darker.

    I used it in a few test photos, alternating with and without the filter. So I'll know its practical effect for my intents and purposes, when I develop that roll of film.

    I'll try to post some of the results up here for all you who, like me, enjoy learning about trivial little things like this.

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
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  11. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    I don't know what a "T" designation is in this situation but Kodak refers to "T" as a light source. (pub # B-#, Kodak Filters for scientific use).
    There is a reference (wiki) to the original Kodachrome film as Type F available in 35mm and 828. ASA12. Also Type T125, T250 & a couple of others obviously with a specific value.

    As I suggested above, since it's an older filter, call Schneider here in the US.
    My money's still on a black and white contrast filter. "0" being the first digit of the catalog # which likely has remained consistant over time.
     
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  12. AgX

    AgX Member

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    The filter in question is from B&W and at least in the assumed time of production the Agfa coding was applied by west-german industry.