Help Identifying old Zeiss Folder

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Joe Jesus, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. Joe Jesus

    Joe Jesus Subscriber

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    I bought this at a yard sale over the summer for about sixty dollars, if memory serves. I've tried finding some info on it, but I've only found Ikonta's and the like online. It has a fantastic f/2.8 Tessar that produces some fantastic images.

    It seems to be called a Super Ikomat BII, and all the markings inside seem to indicate a 6x9 format, but it shoots 6x6 images. It even says 6x9, 2.25x3.25 on the inside.

    Images can be found at http://imgur.com/a/m9984
     
  2. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    That "6x9" thing on the inside is normal with Zeiss folders of this vintage; they marketed the *film* as 6x9 film.

    I think the Super Ikomat name was used for some versions of the Super Ikonta 530; anyway it's some flavor of 6x6 Super Ikonta. You got a terrific price on it!

    -NT
     
  3. Joe Jesus

    Joe Jesus Subscriber

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    Thanks a ton for the info! Any idea as to what this camera may be worth? I highly doubt I'd ever sell it, but I'd still like to know what kind of deal I got.
     
  4. spoolman

    spoolman Subscriber

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    Joe Jesus:The website CollectiBlend (www.CollectiBlend.com/Cameras/ lists this camera,if it is a Zeiss Ikomat 530/16, in average condition, at between $160.00 to $180.00. I would imagine that with the lens that your camera has it would be worth a lot more. Nice find.

    Doug
     
  5. spoolman

    spoolman Subscriber

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    Joe Jesus:The website CollectiBlend (www.CollectiBlend.com/Cameras/ lists this camera,if it is a Zeiss Ikomat 530/16, in average condition, at between $160.00 to $180.00. I would imagine that with the lens that your camera has it would be worth a lot more. Nice find.

    Doug :smile:
     
  6. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    Hate to knock your camera, however it looks a little rough. If you are going to keep it, you might want to see what http://www.certo6.com/ would charge for a CLA. You might need bellows also. He has done a couple of folders for me and I've bee happy with pricing and service. Bill Barber
     
  7. TheToadMen

    TheToadMen Subscriber

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  8. SalveSlog

    SalveSlog Subscriber

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    Shouldn't a 6x6 have a centered frame number window?
     
  9. Joe Jesus

    Joe Jesus Subscriber

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    It looks a little rough, cosmetically, but it functions perfectly! Looks can be deceiving. The bellows are light tight, the RF is bright and accurate, the shutter is accurate at all speeds (by my rough test by ear, at least) and the aperture blades are all clean and clear. I really lucked out on this one!

    530/16. I completely missed that... Looks like everyone here was right.


    Thats what I thought, too, but after putting a roll through it it doesn't seem to be an issue.
     
  10. TheToadMen

    TheToadMen Subscriber

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    530 stands for the camera model and /16 tells you the negative size.

    xxx = 6x4.5 cm neg on 120 film (I think this format didn't have a /xx extension at all)
    xxx/2 = 6x9 neg on 120 film
    xxx/15 = 6.5x11 neg on 616 film
    xxx/16 = 6x6 cm neg on 120 film
    xxx/18 - 3x4 cm on 127 film
    xxx/24 = 24x36 mm neg on 135 film
    (I think this list is correct, but if anyone could check it??)

    Here is some info from Cameraquest:
    "Zeiss Super Ikonta B's are 6x6cm (2 1/4 x 2 1/4) format. Made from the early 1930's to the middle 50's, the various versions can be confusing. Using the 80/2.8 Tessar, the best Tessar was the post war coated version. The best shutter is the post war Synchro Compur. Simplified versions without rangefinders were "Ikontas" (as opposed to "Super Ikontas") fitted with less expensive lenses and shutters. Early versions are labeled "Super Ikomat." Luckily the Super Ikontas A, B, and C all used easily available 120 film in your favorite modern emulsion. The D had an even larger format, for long discontinued 616 film. "
    (source: http://www.cameraquest.com/zikontb.htm)

    See also: http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Zeiss_Ikon_Ikonta
     
  11. pramaglia

    pramaglia Member

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    I have a very similar camera. Actually almost identical. Mine is marked Super-Six and 530/16. I was told mine was not meant for export to the USA. It only has meter markings on it. No feet markings. Shoots 6x6 and is also marked 6x9 inside. I also paid around $60 for it at a local consignment shop. I sent mine to Carol Flutot for a CLAC. I think she charged me $90 to get the shutter working. I inadvertently tried setting the self timer and jammed the shutter. I learned a valuable lesson. Never touch anything painted with a red dot on an old camera. Mine also looks rough, but works great after having is serviced.

    170_7063.jpg 170_7062.jpg
     
  12. elekm

    elekm Member

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    The 530/16 is among the first of the "Super" Ikonta/Ikomat cameras made by Zeiss Ikon.

    The inside marking of "6x9" with a picture of the film box told the user what film to purchase. Instead of marketing the film as "120 roll film," Zeiss Ikon marketed its film as "BII8 - 6x9."

    I believe the Ikomat name was for the U.S. while the Ikonta name was used in Europe. In any case, Zeiss Ikon (not Zeiss) dropped the Ikomat name at some point, reviving the name decades later for a simple Instamatic camera.

    The 530/16 has separate eyepieces for focusing and viewing. Its replacement, the 532/16, unified the viewfinder and rangefinder. The postwar 532/16 eventually added a coated Tessar, and the Super Ikonta BX 533/16 added a selenium meter (and considerable weight and size).

    Typically, a Super Ikonta B will require shutter service, cleaning of the rangefinder and viewfinder optics and relubrication of the lens helical. Once the rangefinder is calibrated, it should never fall out of calibration (except for physical damage) because the rotating wedge prism doesn't depend on pivoting mirrors or prisms. The main rangefinder prism remains fixed, and the only moving parts are the rotating prisms. It's mechnically simple and durable.

    All of the Super Ikonta B cameras had an f/2.8 8cm/80mm lens. Many people, including me, think that Zeiss pushed the Tessar design too far at f/2.8 for this focal length.

    Regardless, it's an easy camera to use. I hold it like I would a 35mm SLR - lens bed sitting on the palm of my left hand, using my thumb to focus the camera.

    It has an autoframing mechanism, and you get only 11 shots per roll. The positioning of the film for each frame is set by a small brass disk under the frame counter.

    Below:
    530/16, 532/16 and 533/16.
    Notice that Zeiss Ikon enlarged the viewfinder for the 532/16.

    I shot with the 532/16 a few weeks ago. I always have fun with this camera.

    [​IMG]
     
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