Help me identify this Agfa film...

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ogisha007, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. ogisha007

    ogisha007 Member

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    I bought this rusty can of film for peanuts a couple of days ago. (crappy pic is attached)

    I only understood that it's cine stock, probably B&W ortochromatic (since it says "Handle in red light only" on the side), but I don't know any more than that.

    The box is still sealed, and I don't currently possess a bulk loader, so I can't test it just yet.

    Does anyone know any specs, such as approximate age and ISO value? Would it be any good to shoot or should I just keep it on my shelf?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. edp

    edp Member

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  3. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    The label shows Agfa as being part of the "I G Farben" group, of which it became one of the constituent companies in 1925. "I G Farben" was dissolved by the allies at the end of World War II, following its activities in wartime production, so the film would have been manufactured some time within that 20-year-period?
     
  4. edp

    edp Member

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    IG Farben was put into liquidation in 1952, and still exists in that state today.

    I would guess this film was made some time between 1952 and 1961.
     
  5. ogisha007

    ogisha007 Member

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    Thanks for the amazingly quick replies. That rusty part doesn't have holes in it (yet), as far as I could inspect.

    So, 50+ years, huh? I guess a month or two in the fridge wont hurt it any more than it's hurt now. :smile:
     
  6. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    Yes, it still exists in law, but I G Farben definitely was not an active manufacturer after the end of WW2....one of its less attractive products during the war was Zyklon B poison gas....this and other activities resulted in war crime prosecutions by the allies. So pre-1945 manufacture, for sure.

    After the war Agfa resumed production as two separate entities, one in West Germany, the other in the Soviet zone (which eventually changed to using the Orwo brand name). The two main factories then were in Leverkusen and Wolfen respectively. (An interesting read, if you google I G Farben and the Agfa/Orwo stories.)
     
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  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    "I only understood that it's cine stock, probably B&W ortochromatic"

    The word Kine is still in use for 35mm camera film, it doesn't necessarily mean it's film for a cine camera. Remember that pre-WWII the 35mm Exacta was the Kine Exacta.

    EFKE still call their 35mm films KB 25, KB 50, KB 100 etc, the K standing for Kine from it's Dr Schleussner / Adox German roots.

    Ian
     
  8. edp

    edp Member

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    I thought KB was 'Kleinbild' (i.e. 35mm), together with R for Rollfilm and PL for Planfilm.
     
  9. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    You're entirely right, I'm used to the term Kine in early adverts for Leica, Contax etc early 35mm cameras.

    Ian
     
  10. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    I'm curious about any inner wrapping. Certainly it won't be in a black plastic bag. Did they use waxed paper in those days? Or was it "going commando" inside that can?
     
  11. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

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    Take it out, roll a 12exp roll in a darkroom/bag/tent and test that baby! Agfa is one of my favorite and most shot films.
     
  12. ogisha007

    ogisha007 Member

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    I'll try to load it up ASAP. I don't have a scanner but I might try some prints if it turns out OK.
     
  13. cmacd123

    cmacd123 Subscriber

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    My first thought when I see that is "Nitrate Film"! and perhaps stewing in its own vapours for 60 years! (sealed can) BE VERY Careful.

    BAck in the 60's Kodak packed their bulk film in a paper bag, or wrapped in black paper. I only ever found one roll of AGFA ISS bulk in my reckless youth, and I can't recall how it was wrapped, which means the black paper is likely.
     
  14. Rolleijoe

    Rolleijoe Member

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    I wouldn't open it at all, now attempt to use it. It's now a piece of history, and should be respected as such. I bought some WW2 vintage unopened Agfa "Aeropan" film for use in air reconnaissance cameras. That was 20 years ago, has Eagle & Hakenkreuz, the whole thing. Have never thought of opening it, and never will.

    I hope you don't ruin the integrity of what you purchased, by attempting to actually use it.

    Just my 2ยข