Help; Selecting frames for a group exhibition?

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by Fintan, May 14, 2004.

  1. Fintan

    Fintan Member

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    For a 60 prints of various sizes, themes, b+w and colour....

    Would it be best to pick the frame/mount to suit each photograph?
    or
    Should they all be the same?
    or
    Should there be a frame type for colour and a different one for b+w?
     
  2. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    THe first question that comes to mind; what does the gallery want?

    WHere are these going to be hanging (how much room do you have)?

    Are other images than yours being hung as well?

    What is the layout of the gallery?

    All the above may dictate the final decision.

    The rule of thumb is generally ( and this is a very global statement, so everyone; don't crazy) to hang all images in the same frame usually "salon" style.
    This does not mean the images are all the same size, rather the frame is hung vertically and the same size;; usually 16 x 20.


    However, with all that said, we are working on a show for next year and as the gallery is an old house, different projects will hang in different rooms with different frames and sizes. Each project has a specific overall frame size and hanging direction. (hope that makes sense). Basically, 80 % will be framed with black metal, the rest in contrast grey or antique wood frames.
     
  3. Fintan

    Fintan Member

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    Thanks Ann, heres a reply to your questions

    >THe first question that comes to mind; what does the gallery want?
    They havent specified at all. They will choose the location of each print but havent said anything about the framing as such.

    >WHere are these going to be hanging (how much room do you have)?
    Lots, we could show more but this gives a nice space between them.

    >Are other images than yours being hung as well?
    No, just our 60 or so prints

    >What is the layout of the gallery?
    Its over two floors and a stairway, the walls are a cream off white colour with halogen type spotlights, varnished wooden [probably pine or birch] floors
     
  4. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    based on that information i would get with the gallery and discuss their guide lines.
     
  5. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Undeniably good advice - contact the Gallery - and ask for - and heed - their help.

    One website might be of help ... [ demarchelier.com ] -

    One of the few sites showing actual gallery installations. Might be of some interest.
     
  6. blansky

    blansky Subscriber

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    I may be wrong on this but I thought the history of photographic displays in galleries tends to have the pictures displayed in "salon frames" namely silver or black frames and tastefully matted.

    The saying "the frame can make the picture" may be the cause of this.

    The gallery wanted the picture to stand on its own merits and have the frame as inobtrusive as possible.

    This may not be the way you would always sell your work but this is I believe they like them to be displayed.

    Personally, I think simple framing and perhaps different frames for b&w vs color would look good.


    Michael McBlane
     
  7. gma

    gma Member

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    Years ago I remember a photo exhibit in an art gallery with glass cut to the exact size of the enlargements and attached to the nailable surface wall with some L shaped nails, two at the top edge near the corners and two at the lower edge near corners. The obvious drawback is the nailable wall.
     
  8. lee

    lee Member

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    I prefer the "L" nail as I don't want to have to buy 20 frames and 20 pieces of glass in 16x20. Takes about 1 hour to fill the nail holes and repaint the repairs on the wall when the exhibit comes down. You do have to buy the glass but not the frames.


    lee\c
     
  9. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    without using frames there is also "swiss clips" and there are several price ranges for those.
     
  10. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Be **very** careful about this and check with he gallery well in advance. Here we have a "jury-rigged* hanging system, consisting of hooks, "rods", electrical conduit --- all to prevent *any* piercing of the wall surface.

    True, nail holes can be patched and repainted, but eventually the surface will be eroded enough to require replacement.

    That is 90% of my volunteer job here - Getting legal releases signed, and intercepting artists attempting to drive nails into the walls.
     
  11. marc oosterhuis

    marc oosterhuis Member

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    displaying multiple photgraphs

    Have you considered plaque or block mounting the images on 3/8 mdf with black beveled edge? Plaqdecor on the search engines should give you some info.
     
  12. papagene

    papagene Membership Council Council

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    Oh man! When ZONE Art Center was alive and well here in Springfield, we used to drive sheet-rock screws right into the bricks and morter to hang work on the walls. I'm surprised the building is still standing. The dancing girls downstairs form ZONE never seemed to be worried.
    Back to the frame issue, it is said that there are many ways to skin a cat. Same goes for framing photos. It's a matter of taste - to a point.
    I like to use 11x14 frames for 8x10 prints and 16x20 frames for 11x14 prints. I use Nielson frames because they are somewhat affordable and of good quality. As far as matting the photos, depends on the image as to how I place the window.
    Hanging an exhibit is an art in itself. I have been involved with setting up shows for over 25 years and how I would do it would differ from someone else. So it would be rather presumptuous of me to tell you how without seeing the work or the space.
    One piece of advise I would like to give is too treat the exhibit as if it was a conversation with the viewer. Group similar images near each other, have good spacing between groups and vary group size. A friend of mine whom I set exhibits up at ZONE taught me this philosophy and it seems to work nicely. A good conversation with the viewer.
    gene