Help with expired Plus-X Pan

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Jeff Bannow, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    So, I haven't dealt much with expired film, but I got a deal on a large lot of expired 220 film. I would like to test the film to determine if it's still good (I have the right to return if I want).

    Here's the details:
    Plus-X Pan in 220
    Expired in around 1997
    Purchased from a studio, has been frozen since it was bought new. (Even was shipped frozen in a cooler with ice packs!)

    I also received 5 rolls of 120 - would it be safe to use the 120 to test for the 220? I assume they are on the same base?

    Should I just do the normal tests for proper film speed and development time?

    I'm using Thornton's Two Bath developer, and Barry Thornton's method for film speed and dev time.
     
  2. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Ding Ding Ding,
    you have hit the jackpot.

    Do you own a densitometer to see the extent of base fog?

    Not sure f I'd use a 2 bath developer but I understand you may want to standardize for you regular practices.

    HC 110 may be a better solution but I bet it's still fine.

    I would love to have a stash of b/w in 220. Especially some Plus X.
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Sure, why not, sounds like a plan to me.
     
  4. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    I do indeed have a densitometer, though I'm not well versed in how to use it. I could however get the b+f from the film. Is there a point at which there is too much b+f?

    I do like the Thornton's, but if it made a big difference I could use a different developer.
     
  5. Simon R Galley

    Simon R Galley Subscriber

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    The test should be on the 220 I am 90% sure it is a different base, it was on ILFORD 220 anyway.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
     
  6. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    Thanks Simon - was it on a thinner base then?
     
  7. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    I'm not sure if it'll help or not, but frozen Plus-X has kept up really well for me in two instances.
    I bought a large lot that expired in 1976, frozen since new, and believe it or not, it was perfectly fine with very little extra base fog.
    I also got hold of a large lot that expired in 1996, frozen since new, and that was like new.

    You stand a good chance of sitting on a batch of very good film, Jeff. Plus-X is wonderful stuff.

    I agree HC-110 is fantastic for expired films; it keeps the base fog low. If you expose generously and use the developer at Dilution B, especially. The longer the film is in the developer, the more the base fog seems to want to show up.

    - Thomas
     
  8. jmdco

    jmdco Member

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    Hello Jeff,
    The frozen films do not ripen. The system expiration date does not matter. Also, after exposure the film you can freeze or store in a cold (+ / - 0 ° C to 5 ° C). But soon to develop the film is preferable because there is the latent image.
    Yours
     
  9. Mark Layne

    Mark Layne Member

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    I realize you don't want to try every developer there is but I have found Xtol with the 40 yr old Efke I have to give the lowest base fog. I also use some very old Plus-x sheet film with minimal problems.
    On the other hand you could send the film to me for safe destruction.
    Mark
     
  10. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    If it was truly frozen I do not think you'd need to adjust anything.

    I too came across a nice big batch of some fairly old Plus-X (late 90's), have been developing in DiXactol and getting some fine results:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rich8155/5549989205/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rich8155/2085184111/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rich8155/1456098933/

    I did not use the two-bath technique, though, all of those are one bath. Time/temp in the image titles.

    That said I've had very nice success with Plus-X in D-76, Rodinal and HC-110....
     
  11. Jeff Bannow

    Jeff Bannow Member

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    Thanks everyone for the responses. Lots to play around with now.
     
  12. jmdco

    jmdco Member

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    Have fun :smile: