Help with film/color/lab/scanning

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by Surly, Jan 27, 2006.

  1. Surly

    Surly Member

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    Hey all, I need to do some color work. I haven't done much and I will be using 35mm. The images will be used for magazine reproduction and will need to be sent electroncally. I simply can't afford to buy the digicam I would prefer, and of course this is APUG so we won't go there :wink:.
    The question is this; I load my Nikon with some color film that will be available for a few years to come and is versatile and sharp. What would that film be? Brand, speed,Print or Slide, I'm easily swayed, but Kodak leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I realize this is subjective but I rarely give more than a passing thought to color photography so I need a good starting point.
    Now, I shoot some fabulous photos (ostensibly) both with flash and available light, handheld and tripod as conditions allow.
    I now need to take that film and send it to a color lab that does good work at reasonable prices and will put all the images on a cd or an FTP server. I could scan the negs myself but frankly, I don't want to spend my time sitting in front of a computer trying not to scratch my negs and cleaning the sodding glass. (I have a flatbed with a neg attachment) A new neg scanner is not really an option, as I said before I dont have the cash.
    To sumarize; 1) Which film 2) Which lab
    I am in the NW corner of Indiana, I do know of a lab local but it's a nightmare getting there before closing and they don't do E-6. C-41 and digital only.
    Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 27, 2006
  2. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    Without knowing the subject matter, I would probably recommend fuji provia as it is a good fine grained film that reproduces well in the magazine world, we have a sponsor here on the system that has been given good reviews on its processing, so you might check with them, Praus Productions, Inc.

    Dave
     
  3. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    If you wish not to use Kodak film the Fuji makes a good choice. You have left out the most important part of information for me to give good advice. What are you going to photograph and for what purpose?

    If you wish a film of fine grain with moderate contrast and want to use C41 then the Fuji 160 color negative films are a good choice. If you want to work with slides then Fuji velvia would be a good choice for intense saturation etc. If you wanted moderate contrast with subtle hue discrimination and good flesh tones then Fuji Astia would be a fine choice.

    If you choose a color negative film the a Prolab that has been serving the wedding and portrait market should be very experienced in giving you what you want. I should add a cautionary note. I have had no scanning done for any reason other than some images put onto a photocd at a 1 hour lab.
     
  4. Robert Brummitt

    Robert Brummitt Member

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    I'm doing a project where I will be photograhing lots of community subjects and activites. I won't be using a digi cam instead its my Nikon F, But, the images have to be electronic for publishing. What I decided to do is this. I'm taking the film to Costco's one hour process and have them burn onto a cd instead of printing. It's a lot cheaper this way. Something like $5.00 per roll of 36 exposures.
    I did a test of this and the results were good for what its needed for.
    I used Fuji film but again for this project I'll have to use Kodak because I need about 100 rolls and money is a factor.
     
  5. Surly

    Surly Member

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    This will be a new motorcycle magazine so the subject matter will be motorcycles and related products. I live a long way from the office so I will be shooting whatever comes up in my area; shows, products, rallies, people. I would certainly use Kodak if that was the best choice, but I dont want to learn a film and have them discontinue it 6mos. later. I've used Portra 160/400/800 in NC and VC with good results but you need a good lab to justify the cost of that film. By that I mean, if you have it processed at Walgreens you might as well have used Walgreens film. I am also aware of the inherent differences between product shots, and the others I mentioned. While this is a bit off topic, I would also be interested in copyright issues in dealing with magazines as well.
     
  6. Dave Parker

    Dave Parker Inactive

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    That depends on your agreement with the magazine, I have shot three differents ways, where I retain copyright on the images, where the magazine has a time agreement on copyright and also where the magazine gets all copyright for the life of the image, that is a point that should be discussed with them, before a frame of film is shot, that way there is no misunderstandings.

    Dave
     
  7. Surly

    Surly Member

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    BUMP
     
  8. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Provia 100F and perhaps 400F if you anticipate low light. They are fine grained for their speed and punchy without producing exaggerated color like Velvia (but look at the magazine--maybe they want extra vivid color, and they might be happier with Velvia 100F--there's no accounting for taste). Both push one stop nicely.

    If you're going to use a mail-order lab, I recommend A&I. They are a big pro lab in LA but the prices using the mailers are very reasonable compared to the usual over the counter prices at a NYC or LA pro lab (including A&I). www.aandi.com
     
  9. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If you shoot slide be careful with exposure and scene contrast (Black leather and chrome in the same shot scares me). I'd be more inclined to go with Kodak 100/400 uc for most of the reasons David gives plus it will lower your risk. Scanning 35mm for mag use can be done with a dedicated film scanner (Nikon, Canon Minolta) that scans @ 3-4k, 2k if nothing is to be made full page. The new Fuji Pro films might work, but I haven't tried them.
     
  10. Surly

    Surly Member

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    Thanks for the tips so far. The magazine does not exist as of yet so there is no point of reference except other magazines. The point about black leather and chrome is a good one. I would be more inclined to use print vs. slide for the latitude (read: incorecct exposure on the part of the photographer :wink: ).