Here's a tip for y'all

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by dnjl, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. dnjl

    dnjl Member

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    Don't put your plastic film reels in the microwave to dry in between runs, because they will melt. Ask me how I know...
     
  2. NB23

    NB23 Member

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    Who uses plastic reels?

    There are just too many downsides to using those things, starting with wasting at least 25% more chemicals Versus Stainless steel ones.
     
  3. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I do use a hair dryer when I'm pressed for reels/time.
     
  4. jk0592

    jk0592 Member

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    I always have twice the number of reels that my tanks handle, so always have a dry set of reels on hand.
     
  5. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Well I have learned something. I had always assumed that the only reason that inert materials such as plastic or ceramics got hot in a microwave was the presence of liquids or food inside them. I didn't think that microwaves could heat up inert objects.

    pentaxuser
     
  6. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    There are distinct advantages to having a gas stove with pilot light. - David Lyga
     
  7. mwdake

    mwdake Member

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    I do, have done for 40 years.
    I use Pyrovpcat HD and Thornton's Two Bath which cost pennies per film so I am not too worried about wasting chemicals. The only time I had trouble loading plastic reels was with 35mm but I only do 120 and large format now and don't have any problems with 120 and plastic reels.
     
  8. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    plastic reels have ball bearings in them
    metal isn't good for microwaves, they probably arced
    and melted because the metal heated ...
     
  9. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

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    I have both. Interesting hypothesis, I have never noticed any difference in chemical use between stainless or plastic. :confused:

    I have used the plastic ones for years and years and they work great. Beyond small differences between tank capacity, and small differences in loading the reels, they certainly seem to work the same. Since I have not noticed any difference in chemical use I am wondering what the other "many downsides" might be.
     
  10. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I stuck my head in the microwave and destoyed the microwave!
     
  11. aleksmiesak

    aleksmiesak Member

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    Ha! That's a great tip. And I also love my Paterson tank and reels for 120. I even develop my 4x5 using taco method before I get the MOD thingy. And I also have a spare set of reals so I always have dry ones to rotate between. One thing I noticed is water likes to sit around the ball bearing and that's what may cause problems. Make sure you dry that part with a paper towel and you're good to go. Never had any major problem with them. As opposed to my failed attempts at steel. I am getting a few Hewes reels (supposed to be better) only because I inherited a bunch of steel tanks so I might as well use them. But I'm not optimistic...
     
  12. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    "Ask me how I know..." so now I am asking you. Please supply all the details!

    I use the Hewes steel reels for 135 and 120 in steel tanks for black & white processing. I rinse the steel reels and let them air dry. I have never put steel reels in the microwave nor do I plan to ever.

    The only plastic reels I use now are when I use the Jobo processor for color processing and occasionally for black & white processing. I rinse the plastic reels and let them air dry.
     
  13. Patrick Robert James

    Patrick Robert James Subscriber

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    I melted some Jobo caps in the oven once. They turned into pretzels. Thankfully that was back when Jobo stuff could be had for pennies. I am more careful now, plus I have a whole bunch of tanks! No need to dry them right away.
     
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  15. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    I hope there wasn't too much mess in the microwave! During the reduction in popularity of darkroom work (and it was very popular at one time) I visited junkshops and house-clearances to buy tanks and reels for minimal cost. I now have enough to keep me in dry reels all day.

    Umpteen people use each sort of tank successfully, so one can just stick with what works for you (apart from in the microwave of course). It's true that the steel tanks and Jobo plastic ones take slightly less chemistry per reel than the Patersons, but the Paterson tanks fill and empty much quicker and are easier to clean. The famous "gain on the swings but lose on the roundabouts" thing.
     
  16. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Thanks. I should have read more closely the make of the reels. So if there were no ball bearings and there are none in Jobo reels which are entirely plastic then with what little water is left on the reels insufficient heating would take place to damage the reels and a microwave would work?

    pentaxuser
     
  17. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    Not all plastics are microwave safe. But I have no clue which, or why.
     
  18. john_s

    john_s Subscriber

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    At least the water on the reels in the microwave would reach boiling point. I don't know if that would be enough to cause heat damage to the particular plastic used for the reels.
     
  19. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Isn't the melting point of plastic such as is used in a Jobo reel way above the melting point of water?

    pentaxuser
     
  20. BardParker

    BardParker Member

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    Hair dryer works great on plastic reels before loading. Kent
     
  21. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi pentaxuser
    i don't know what kind of reels he used, maybe they didn't have metal bits in them
    but it was something to think about just the same :smile:

    some plastics become limp when warmed even with a hair dryer.
    i used to take rigid sheets of plastic and warm them to make them form
    different shapes.

    who knows what plastic reels are made of, HOT water to rinse them, and a few raps on a towel and air dry always worked for me ...
    i use metal reels for the most part, and always have more than i need ...

    - john
     
  22. NB23

    NB23 Member

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    All the known downsides which is why the Stainless Steel the serious choice for the serious photographer.
     
  23. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    Do you mean boiling point of water?


    Don't try drying your sock in a microwave either!


    Steve.
     
  24. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    That's it Steve. I got confused between melting and boiling. I think it was Newton who that said liquids boil and solids melt and then won the BBC masterchef competition with his cottage pie R squared or was that Euclid?:D

    Anyway, am I right that a few spots of water left on a Jobo reel will boil and evaporate on the reel, leaving it dry and undamaged?

    Einstein tried to get what he thought was a simple answer to such a query on APUG but in the end became frustrated and turned his attention to Relativity as it was easier. Alas my maths and physics aren't good enough to let me do the same :D

    pentaxuser
     
  25. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Haha, I once put my Paterson tank on a windowsill to dry, just behind my microwave - that had a built-in grill function. I didn't realise just how much heat the cooling fins chucked out behind the unit... you can guess what happened to the tank. Let's just say it never processed another film! :laugh:

    Cheers,
    kevs.
     
  26. pbromaghin

    pbromaghin Subscriber

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    Along with Pioneer, they are unknown to me, also. Would you care to enumerate some of them?