High Contrast developer b&w

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Paulo Roberto, Mar 21, 2009.

  1. Paulo Roberto

    Paulo Roberto Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I need a high contrast and high speed developer for b&w film. More than Diafine or Kodak D8. Any idea ?
     
  2. Jean Noire

    Jean Noire Member

    Messages:
    587
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    D163 diluted 1+3, although a print developer, can be used for high contrast work and increased speed especially for tri-x. You would have to do tests on the film and it gives grain like golf balls.
    Regards,
    John.
     
  3. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    Location:
    Plymouth. UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Kodak D-19 perhaps? what film are you using, what sort of subject and what effect are you trying to achieve?
     
  4. sidearm613

    sidearm613 Member

    Messages:
    269
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I would agree with keith. D-19 is the way to go.
    David
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,436
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There is a recent thread on this here on APUG that might be of use.

    PE
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,826
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    John & Keith, the OP wants higher contrast than Kodak D8, both D163 and D19 are much lower in contrast in comparison :D

    Perhaps he needs to be a bit more explicit.

    Ian
     
  7. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    Location:
    Plymouth. UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ian, I agree, but the OP hasn`t mentioned specifically what film is being used or exactly what he or she is trying to achieve. A high contrast ortho-film for example might be a better option rather than a regular general use film. If the OP is more specific, it would make the question easier to answer.:smile:
     
  8. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

    Messages:
    8,005
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'd use Dektol or A+B graphic arts developer. Experiment first, with different dilutions and times, and exposures too.
     
  9. Keith Tapscott.

    Keith Tapscott. Member

    Messages:
    1,426
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    Location:
    Plymouth. UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There is more than one way to achieve high contrast, but it depends on what the OP`s goal is. Is it to make B&W enlargements? The use of a high contrast film developed in a high contrast developer and the use of extra hard grades of B&W paper spring to mind, but without specifically knowing, it is a difficult question to help with.
     
  10. Jean Noire

    Jean Noire Member

    Messages:
    587
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    This is true. 'Tis a bit vague but if he really wanted high contrast then lith film may be the answer, if still available but hardly high speed.
    Regards,
    John.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2009
  11. Paulo Roberto

    Paulo Roberto Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'm using AGFA microfilm EcoPos 305 for microfiche. Temp 37ºC
    Developer 80 gr sodium sulfite, 40 gr hidroquinone, 40 gr potassium hidroxyde and 20 gr potassium bromide. Dmax=2,50 Ok ! but time to developer is high
     
  12. mts

    mts Subscriber

    Messages:
    360
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Look into using one of the X-ray developers. I have used DuPont X-ray developer for P3200 film and gotten a nice straight line, steep characteristic curve.
     
  13. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,181
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Contrast greater than D-8 means a litho developer like D-9. D-11 is a less energetic possibility. Microfilm developers generally are in the ballpark. D-19, Dektol, and their like are lower contrast.
     
  14. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,726
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2002
    I would think that if one added a bunch of bromide to full strength Dektol and developed the heck out of most any film, you could get charcoal in snow, or at least dark chocolate in vanilla out of most any scene.
     
  15. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,826
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    When I get a bit more time I'll post a faster working developer for you. The quoted time is 0.2 seconds @ 180°F which by my reckoning will be more like 0.57 seconds at 37°C. The quoted time for D8 is 2 minutes at 2 parts Dev + 1 water.

    The secret is no Potassium Bromide, instead a very high level of Benzotriazole.

    The formula is by C Orlando, from Phot. Sc. Eng. no idea about the contrast.

    Metol 13 g
    Sodium Sulphite (and) 80 g
    Hydroquinone 26 g
    Sodium Hydroxide 26 g
    Benzotriazole 200 g
    Water to 1 litre

    Dev time 0.2 seconds @ 180°F or a more manageable 0.57 seconds @ 37°C

    You'd need to experiment but dropping the bromide level in D8 and adding and increasing the Benzotriazole instead will have a huge impact on the development times. The Bromide is at such high levels that it inhibits development.

    Ian
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 22, 2009
  16. Paulo Roberto

    Paulo Roberto Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2008
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Benzotriazole 200 g its correct ?
     
  17. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    17,826
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My mistake that should be 200ml of 1% solution apologies I was rather tired last night :D

    There's a second formula which has the same amount, and a similar 0.2 sec dev time @ 170°F or this one which uses KBR & Benzotriazole, it's much closer to D8.

    The formula is by L.S. Fortmiller, from Phot. Eng. again no idea about the contrast.

    Metol 5 g
    Sodium Sulphite (and) 90 g
    Hydroquinone 45 g
    Sodium Hydroxide 40 g
    Potassium Bromide 10 g
    Benzotriazole 1% 25 ml
    Water to 1 litre

    Dev time 1 minute @ 140°F

    Benzotriazole can be substituted for the Bromide usually at around a tenth the quantity but this will vary with the formula.

    Ian