High speed x-ray processing - how does it work?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by mkillmer, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. mkillmer

    mkillmer Member

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    I've read many descriptions of X-Ray processors that produce images in just a few minutes - some are very fast...
    Konica Minolta SRX-101A produces images in 90 seconds.
    http://www.konicaminolta.com/healthcare/products/analogue/xray/

    How does that work? Even if I have a Super developer, how can the fixer get washed off so quickly?
    X-rays are archival - so something tricky must be going on...
    Any ideas?
    I am mostly interested in the fixing and washing of the film. Does x-ray film not absorb the fixer (similar to RC paper?) - I am wanting to speed up my process...
     
  2. richard ide

    richard ide Member

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    Some films have developing agents incorporated in the emulsion. I remember using a film which developed completely in less than 1 second. Processors usually use elevated temperatures. My 49" processor would deliver a dry print or film in about that length of time. Thirty years later there is no sign of deterioration of image.
     
  3. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    Not really - most have a very limited lifetime and are then sent to Ag recovery.
     
  4. VPooler

    VPooler Member

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    High temperatures, very high concentrations. Atleast in that machine that I saw in action. The smell of chemicals was both warm and nauseating. Took 2 minutes to spit out the film from the other end.
     
  5. mkillmer

    mkillmer Member

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    Hmmm.... not sure about that.

    X-Rays are viewed as stable and permanent records. My wife commonly works with x-rays from 40 years ago.
     
  6. AgX

    AgX Member

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    The Rapidoprint System (graphic films and papers) took only 75sec for exposed film to come out as developed, dry film (dev/fix/wash/wash/dry).
     
  7. mkillmer

    mkillmer Member

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    I assumed something like this - do you know about washing process? Is the film base made of a different material to "normal" film? I'm curious how they can be washed so quickly.
     
  8. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Alternatively there are washless systems that change the unexposed halide into quite stable compounds instead of emoving them.
     
  9. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Not sure which country you refer to. In USA it varies from state to state. Typically 5 to 7 years then recycle for silver.
     
  10. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    ahh... 40 years ago - things were different.

    I'm sure hospitals have x-ray labs that have more archival processes (lots of x-rays today are digital), but some places (like urgent care) need fast, simple processing.
     
  11. mkillmer

    mkillmer Member

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    Yes, I agree, but I believe modern x-rays will still last. The local hospitals here are all digital - film x-rays are now the domain of veterinarians.
     
  12. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member

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    They will last BECAUSE they are digital and part of a patent's permanent digital record that can be shared with the various doctors treating a patent.


    Ag based x-rays are far too valuable as Ag scrap to sit in filing cabinets for years.
     
  13. VPooler

    VPooler Member

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    Hmm, I don't know the exact chemical makeup but the xray of my skull I have at home seems to be on regular polyester base.
     
  14. AgX

    AgX Member

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    In the begin substituting fxing & washing for stabilisating was popular (2 step processing).
    Then washing was re-introduced (4 step processing). Miraculous fast...

    Keep in mind that most uses (like graphic arts) did not need really archival results.