historical issue: film developers in Germany of 1930s

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Igor Savchenko, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. Igor Savchenko

    Igor Savchenko Member

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    What film developer (for roll film and 35 mm) was most commonly used in Germany in 1930s (among those formulated in Germany) and could be considered a kind of standard/ benchmark as D-76 in the US and ID-11 in UK? Could it be Agfa-12?
    Your response is highly appreciated...

    Igor
     
  2. Alan Johnson

    Alan Johnson Subscriber

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    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 1, 2009
  3. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    A big problem with Agfa is that the German formula sometimes differ from the Agfa Ansco (GAF) ones, while some are identical a few with the same number are entirely different with quite opposite purposes.

    Agfa 19 (German) was the direct equivalent of D76/ID-11 it's identical except for Bromide which must have been used as a starter, these developers were always used in deep tanks at one time, and replenished.

    Ian
     
  4. Harry Lime

    Harry Lime Member

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    Probably Rodinal.

    From what I have read the Leitz/Stoekler/DD23 type developers were also widely used.
     
  5. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    These German companies sold Developers in the UK in195: Hauff, Fesagel, Agfa, Voightlander (made by Gevaert) there would have been more.

    Ian
     
  6. JPD

    JPD Member

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    I'll take a look in the "Das Deutsche Lichtbild 1937" to see what the photographers included in the book used for the published photos:

    Rodinal 1:40

    Eastman DK 76

    David-rezept 1:3

    Tetenal Emofin

    Agfa-Feinkorn 15

    Rodinal 1:50

    Rodinal 1:20

    Kodak D-76

    Tetenal Ultrafin

    Perutz-Feinkorn

    Final

    Parvofin 1:1

    Egalisin

    Mikrolin

    Perinal 1:20

    Leicanol

    Tetenal Ultrafin S.F.

    Micros

    And some just bescrived as Metol-Hydrochinon, Glyzin, Pyro-Metol, Paraphenylendiamin, Pyrogallol, Glyzin-Pottasche, Glyzin Standentwickler. Windisch developer is also mentioned in another of the yearbooks.
     
  7. JPD

    JPD Member

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    Some more from "Das Deutsche Lichtbild 1935":

    Finaccord

    Hauff-Glyzinbrei 1:40

    Planol

    Hauff Neol 1:6

    Brenzkatechinentwickler (Catechol developer)

    Metol-Adurol

    Kodak Pyramidon 1:4,5, Tankentwickler D-7

    Metodux

    Glyzin + Rodinal
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Now can you post the Formulae, in full detail please :D

    Ian
     
  9. JPD

    JPD Member

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    I don't think there was a benchmark standard developer in Germany at the time. Rodinal and various MQ developers were the most popular. In the german photo books and magazines from the 30's I've never seen any tests or comparsions like we are used to today.
     
  10. JPD

    JPD Member

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    No! :D

    Many of the photographers published in the "Deutsche Lichtbild" books mixed their own developers, and just called them "Metol-Hydrochinon", "Glyzin", "Metol-Soda", and for some strange reason they also wrote the dilution they used, 1:6 for example. How important is THAT when we have no clue what recipe they used. One of them just called his film developer "borax". :D
     
  11. john_s

    john_s Subscriber

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    I have a scanned copy of an Agfa-Ansco formula booklet from 1941. It's 5megabytes. Is it appropriate to upload it to APUG either in this thread or elsewhere?
     
  12. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It's already online :smile:

    Not sure how you could upload to APUG, presumably it's a PDF. An older copy is also online.

    Ian
     
  13. Mark Antony

    Mark Antony Member

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  14. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It's quite likely Agfa 17 gives finer grain, & better sharpness as well as tonality than D76, it's closer to Adox Borax MQ, it was also commercially available as a pakaged developer.

    Ian
     
  15. Mark Antony

    Mark Antony Member

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    Ian what modern developer is similar to Agfa 17? was it similar to Studional? Also am I correct that D76 wasn't available commercially until 1938?
    thanks
    Mark
     
  16. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Mark, I'm not sure about the German Aga commercial film devs, there was also Agfa 19 which is D76 with a small amount of Bromide.

    Kodak were still researching D76 variants in 1935 & beyond, it may not have been on general sale until 1938, no Kodak chemistry is listed in the 1935 BJP Amanacsadverts I have, in fact on the page of "Supplies for the Photo-Finishing Trade" there's every thing except chemistry. There's separate adverts for Kodak Australia/New Zealand again no chemistry. No Kodak chemistry in New Products either.

    Maybe Kodak didn't make chemistry until 1938, at least in the UK/Australia.

    Ian
     
  17. JPD

    JPD Member

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    Agfa 17 is a fine developer. I use it 1+1 for many films. Pan F+, Tri-X, Efke...
     
  18. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Mark, Studional is a PQ developer and also quite different to Agfa 17, it's not a PQ version.

    Ian
     
  19. Igor Savchenko

    Igor Savchenko Member

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    Dear All -

    Many thanks for your contributions!