horizontal enlarger project

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by Murray@uptowngallery, Aug 25, 2007.

  1. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    There are many camera construction sites well-documented on the web.

    I would like to observe others' efforts with enlarger construction. Can anyone please refer me to any sites depicting successful homebrew horizontal LF enlargers?

    Thanks

    M
     
  2. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Be sure and look for process camera conversions to enlargers. Clyde Butcher has a huge one converted you can see in a picture on his website. As they are being tossed in the scrapheap you might be able to get a smaller one and make it work for you. Most of the work will be in the light source and the neg carrier, the rest is already there.
     
  3. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Member

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    Hello Murray,

    Though I haven't enlarged 8x10 negs for quite some time now, my solution was to use my 8x10 camera as the "base" for the enlarger. I custom designed and built a platform that allowed me to securely attach the camera to it with a raised box (if you will) right behind the rear standard that held my 12x12 Aristo coldlight source. I, also, designed and built a "back" which replaced the spring back of the camera. This unit held the film against a single piece of glass (to help with film flatness) and actually clipped onto the back of the camera just like the regular spring-back.

    Load the film into my custom holder, slide the light source into place against the holder, add a process lens, a magnetic wall easel (Wisner sold these at one time) and some paper, and you're ready to roll! I tried to be as accurate as possible with alignment between the camera and the wall, but I didn't use anything like a Zig unit, or anything like that. Once the camera was squared up I used a couple of identical length boards to position the camera platform with respect to the wall. Since I never made a print larger than 16x20 I guess the alignment wasn't a big deal once the lens was stopped down a little.

    Typing this makes it all sound way more complicated then it was...a few days work figuring out the design and, then, doing the woodworking...okay, I admit, it was maybe a few more than a few days, but the cost factor was minimal.

    Good luck. Let us know what you finally end up doing.
     
  4. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Thanks.

    It'll be a while, but one little step at a time...
     
  5. Peter De Smidt

    Peter De Smidt Member

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    Well, the easiest thing to do would be to find a real horizontal enlarger.I bought mine for $400 a few years ago, a De Vere 810H complete with color head, and there's no way I could've build something workable as inexpensively. You might also try to find an old "autofocus" Elwood. These have a pivot on the column that allows one to tilt it sideways, but the whole enlarger is cast iron, and it ways a ton. You'd probably have to move the easel to change sizes, and that'd be hard to do while keeping everything in alignment.
     
  6. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

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    Thank you.

    I was thinking Superstrut steel frame on wheels.

    M