Hot press - pressing prints larger than platen size

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by tkamiya, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    My hot press has a platen size of 19x16. Because of the way arm is made, it is possible to slide larger piece side ways.

    Is it possible or even advisable to try to press, say 16x20 print, and come out looking perfectly pressed? Or, would it cause a crease where the platen ended? For the same token, is it possible/advisable to try to dry mount larger prints than the platen size?

    In theory, it looks as if the ridge on the form caused by years of use might cause problems but I have no ways to try this, yet.

    I am not interested in trying to use any other method for flattening the print. If you have an actual experience, I'm interested in hearing from you.

    Thank you.
     
  2. ROL

    ROL Member

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  3. ParkerSmithPhoto

    ParkerSmithPhoto Subscriber

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    Most presses have some sort of threaded adjustment screws on the top platen that allow you to adjust pressure. For flattening the print and/or dry mounting, the heat really does the work. You want the press to close firmly, but you don't want to have to force it, or you will get a crease if the print overlaps the edge.

    The presses are designed this way so you can adjust the pressure and mount pieces much larger than the platen by using multiple passes. Use some old prints and adjust the settings.

    Keep it consistent, too. If you set the pressure for dry mounting on 3/16 foam core, then use a piece of the same board underneath when you are flattening prints. Get some release paper for both processes. Always use release paper above the print; matt board can emboss the print.
     
  4. George Collier

    George Collier Member

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    What they said, plus how you support the overhanging portion is important, not to high, not too low. My suggestion is to have a supporting surface for this part, rather than holding it up manually during the pressing of the other part(s). If you aren't careful, you can get lines in the surface from "bending" at the end of the platen edge.
    It can be as simple as a stack of books.
     
  5. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    When I have to dry mount photos larger than the platen, I sandwitch the print and mount board between pieces of mat board that extend beyond the platen. This greatly reduces embossing by the edge of the platen.
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    It's a good idea to have a pair of large sheets. I'll do that. Thanks everybody! (and ROL, thanks for the link)
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Same as above, I've used my press for years that way for larger prints both for flattening and in the past dry mounting. The scret is getting all the boards dry before you start and keeping them that way over a session.

    Ian
     
  8. Grainy

    Grainy Member

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    Don't know the english word, but is it okay to use "pizza paper" as releasepaper?
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Is it the same as Parchment Paper?
     
  10. Grainy

    Grainy Member

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    Looks like parchment paper is the right word, or baking paper.
     
  11. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    In English in the UK we call it grease proof or baking paper. I wouldn't use it personally, I prefer to use mount card, however the odd times I've mounted high gloss papers I've used silicon paper designed specifically for dry mounting.

    Ian
     
  12. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I used all kinds of paper that looked like baking paper, wax paper, etc with shiny non-stick surfaces.

    They all stuck like crazy when used with dry mount sheets.
     
  13. Grainy

    Grainy Member

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    Okay, thanks. I'm going to dry mount a print for the first time in a few days. I've bought mount board and dry mount tissue, only waiting for the press (a t-shirt press).
     
  14. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    When I got my press and without a release paper, I went to a local frame shop and bought a sheet off of a shop owner so I can get started. It's reusable for dozens of times. Since then, I bought a roll of it but still using the orignal sheet. It's expensive but you don't need much of it. I would suggest doing it the right material....
     
  15. Grainy

    Grainy Member

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    I will buy release paper soon, but it will be a few weeks before I get it. Just curious to start testing.
     
  16. Grainy

    Grainy Member

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    Baking paper worked, so then I can use it until I get the release paper. But I have to find something to put between the press and the paper, because the press made som marks through the paper. Maybe some mat board or something similar.
     
  17. ParkerSmithPhoto

    ParkerSmithPhoto Subscriber

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    Release paper is coated with silicone. It's pricy, but it lasts forever, especially if you are just flattening prints.

    Rather than buying a whole roll, you may be able to buy a couple of pieces from a local picture framer. One of the best things we did was get a wholesale account with a local framing supplier. You can get all of your finishing supplies at very low prices. In Georgia, a roll of the release paper is about $60 wholesale.

    EDIT: Classic case of not reading the rest of the thread before replying!
     
  18. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Right. It is common to use two pieces of mat board and put the print between it. I also use release paper between the emulsion side of the print and the mat board. Otherwise, I risk getting the texture of the mat board on the print.

    Be sure to keep these mat boards clean. Any particles caught in it will leave marks on the print.