How big of an issue is wind?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Sean, Nov 30, 2002.

  1. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    I'll be going 8x10 soon and was curious about wind problems. Sometimes you can get a calm day in New Zealand, but most of the coastal areas (where I'll be living) almost alwyas have a breeze or moderate to strong wind. Can these issues be dealt with using faster shutter speed, wind blocking devices, etc? Curious how others handle this obstacle. Thanks, Sean
     
  2. bmac

    bmac Member

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    I hope you've been pumping iron. Time to buy a heavy tripod! Make sure all the movements are locked down tight.
     
  3. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (bmacphoto.com @ Nov 30 2002, 06:45 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I hope you've been pumping iron. &nbsp;Time to buy a heavy tripod! &nbsp;Make sure all the movements are locked down tight.</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    Well, there are lots of sheep around here. I could always strap my gear onto a sheep. [​IMG]
     
  4. lee

    lee Member

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    Wind is an issue. I recommend a faster film. LIke something in the 400 speed range. You don't need to "improve" the grain for contact printing and you will get at least one more stop out of that speed film. I was in the Big Bend National Park last summer and it was hot and windy. My shooting mate was prone to 100 (FP4) and was bitching all the time about the long times and slow shutter speeds. My film showed no movement at all. His did.

    lee
     
  5. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (lee @ Dec 2 2002, 05:12 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>My shooting mate was prone to 100 (FP4) and was bitching all the time about the long times and slow shutter speeds. My film showed no movement at all. His did.

    lee</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    And you did not lend him any film? some friend you are! [​IMG]
     
  6. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It's an issue. Faster film is a good solution. So is a folding umbrella. I often block the wind with my body or stabilize the camera by resting a hand on the part that seems to be vibrating. Sometimes you just have to wait. If you've got high wind and fast moving clouds, this might mean waiting for the light to come from behind the clouds, for the cloud formation to be attractive, and for the wind to stop all at once. In some places it can be frustrating enough, that I just shoot a smaller format.
     
  7. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    Cool,, unless I'm in Wellington NZ then I should be able to get by with waiting for the wind to die down, or a golf umbrella. I have also seen special wind blocking kits custom designed for LF photography. But maybe you pay them 250 bucks and the send you an umbrella <grin>
     
  8. BobF

    BobF Member

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    I have used the golf umbrella idea, or moving my jeep upwind of the camera position, or waiting and waiting and waiting, but the most reliable solution is often a Fuji GSW690.
     
  9. avandesande

    avandesande Member

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    Buy a c-1.
     
  10. Tom Duffy

    Tom Duffy Member

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    Very good advice, thus far. Tripod, head, windbreaks, fast film, etc.

    But nothing has improved my success rate in wind so much as replacing my wooden view camera with a rigid metal monorail or drop bed camera.

    It sometimes feels like you're moving an artillery piece into position, but if you work in a consistantly breezy environment, it would be worth serious consideration.
     
  11. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member Admin

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    this is the Gandolfi I'm looking at. It seems like it would be pretty sturdy. Are you saying the monorails are more heavy, therefore more sturdy?
     
  12. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    Sean I have used the camera in fairly strong winds and had no problem. I think the wind situation would be better dealt with a good strong tripod.
    A heavier camera does help, but as always it is a compromise. Weight vs portability.
     
  13. Tom Duffy

    Tom Duffy Member

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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Ross @ Dec 3 2002, 10:24 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Are you saying the monorails are more heavy, therefore more sturdy?</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>
    I would prefer to say that monorails and drop beds are the sturdiest view cameras by virtue of design, irrespective of weight. In general, they are also the heaviest. In my opinion, this combination makes them the best choice for use in windy conditions.

    The Gandolfi looks to be a fine camera and I'm sure you can't go wrong with it. But you owe it to yourself to take a hands on look at a monorail, given the windy conditions you describe, so that you can make a more informed decision.

    In purchasing a camera you have any number choices on a continuum from light, flimsy, and portable all the way up to heavy, rigid, and not portable. each will offer advantages and disadvantages. It may be that the Gandolfi offers you the perfect combination of weight, rigidity and portability.

    My metal monorail allows me to take sharp pictures in wind conditions my wooden field camera couldn't cope with but it's a pain to carry far from the car.