How can I create craquelure on the film surface?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by thanos, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. thanos

    thanos Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Location:
    Greece
    Shooter:
    35mm
    A couple of years ago I read a tutorial on some site (regret not bookmarking it) that somehow created a pattern of cracks on the emulsion. It involved something like a thermal shock with frozen/boiled water and some chemical. I really liked the results but forgot about it since I didn't have access to a darkroom. Now, does anyone know what I'm talking about? I'd like to try and print such an effect in the darkroom. Also, if it's possible to create the effect with household chemicals, I'd appreciate it.

    I searched 'film craquelure' and variants on google to no effect [bad pan - i know :smile:].

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 24, 2012
  2. Barry S

    Barry S Member

    Messages:
    1,347
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Location:
    DC Metro
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    It sounds like you want to try to create film reticulation. You need to start with an old formulation film like Fomapan or Efke and develop, stop, and fix (no hardener) as normal. Then you thermal shock the film by plunging it into very cold water--and the soft emulsion shrinks and cracks.
     
  3. pgomena

    pgomena Member

    Messages:
    1,382
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, Or
    Try looking for "reticulation." The film is not cracked, but forms a pattern of crack-like ridges in the emulsion. The not-so-secret is to develop your film normally and then dip it into alternate cold and hot water baths. This alternately shrinks and swells the emulsion leaving the worm-like pattern of ridges. I find it's fairly easy to do accidentally, especially when using an emulsion hardening developer like PMK. I've accidentally reticulated Tri-X sheet film developed in PMK on a couple of occasions just by having poor temperature controls in processing.

    Peter Gomena
     
  4. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,623
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, M
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,972
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    you could always coat your film with water-glass ( sodium silicate ) and roll a brayer or something else over it,
    or bend it &c.
     
  6. thanos

    thanos Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Location:
    Greece
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Yes. Yes. That's exactly what i'm looking for. Thank you everyone!
     
  7. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

    Messages:
    2,129
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Location:
    NYC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You might want to do this on dupes, as this process is quite random.

    Another option to get a crackle effect is to enlarge the image though a crackled glass plane or crumbled cello that is flat on top of the photopaper.
     
  8. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,972
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    if you find silicate,
    it washes off with warm water ..
    ( so it isn't permanent )
     
  9. thanos

    thanos Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Location:
    Greece
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Interesting. I'll try this too. Thanks
     
  10. thanos

    thanos Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Location:
    Greece
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Actually I don't know what is silicate and what to do with it.
     
  11. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,972
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    water glass is a clear liquid they use to coat eggs ..
    they also use it in everything from masonry to auto repair

    it will dry and form a thin layer, that can be manipulated &c...
    unlike collodion, waterglass is not sensitive/flammable

    have fun !
    john
     
  12. thanos

    thanos Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Location:
    Greece
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Aha! Found it. Thanks jnanian, will try that too.
     
  13. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,972
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    put it on a piece of scrap useless film before you put it
    on your negative .. make sure it washes off ...
    last i used it i had no trouble removing it, but younever know ...

    have fun !
    john