How can I remove anti-halation layer from C41 film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Bohngy, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. Bohngy

    Bohngy Member

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    Hi all,

    I'm home developing 5x4 sheet film in some home made tubes. My problem is that the film 'sticks' to the inside of the tube and the chemistry often doesn't completely remove the anti-halation layer from the back of the sheet.

    This isn't a problem with black and white, as the anti-halation layer is water soluble and I could 'wash' it off after fixing.

    As the C41 film doesn't seem to have a water soluble AH layer, can I put the film, after Blix, back into the developer to remove the AH layer, then a brief blix (1minute maybe) before the normal 5-7min rinse?

    Sorry if this is a silly question, but I'm rather new to this 'homebrew" C41 stuff.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    I'm watching this thread... I did not think that C41 HAD an "anti-halation" layer.
    The respooled motion picture stock from Seattle Film DID, much to the horror of a few one-hour machine operators (one roll would gum up the whole works) but that was NOT "C41".
    I've developed a few (actually sgnificantly more than a "few") rolls of 35mm and 120, and haven't had to "remove an anti-halation layer" yet.
     
  3. Bohngy

    Bohngy Member

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    Hmmm... that's got me thinking. I thought all films had an anti halation layer. Either way I'm getting streaks that look to be originating on the back, i.e. non emulsion, side of the film. I assumed it was an AH layer because I've seen the same problem when developing 5x4 B&W sheet film...

    can anyone shed a little light on this (no pun intended)?
     
  4. Anon Ymous

    Anon Ymous Member

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    All films have AH layer. C41, E6 etc are no exceptions. The other MP films you mention have remjet coating. It might function as an AH layer, but it's not just for that.
     
  5. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    C41 & E6 films are best processed in a way that allows flow of chemistry to front & back, Jobo make 5x4 reels and HP & Yankee tanks are also suitable.

    Ian
     
  6. rternbach

    rternbach Member

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    I am a newbie so my answer is in the form of a question: Can you pre-rinse the film in distilled HOH for a minute before processing and will this wash off the halation layer and prevent the film from sticking to the tubes?

    Best,

    Rudy
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Unfortunately few films allow that usually just Adox/EFKE B&W films.

    Ian
     
  8. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    There might be a film construction where there is some sort of "provision" for controlling "halation" - but I don't know about a specific "layer" dedicated to that purpose, except fpr the "rem-jet" on motion picture stock.
    Be that as it may, NONE of the Black and White, C41, E6, IR ... or anything else I have processed has required "anti-halation layer removal". As far as I know, there is no specific "step" or "chenical solution" specifically dedicated for that puropse, and I for one have never noticed a need for that, either.
    But ... I certainly am NOTHING like an "expert" here - possibly PE (who, in my book, has passed that requirement long ago) can offer resolution here.
     
  9. nickrapak

    nickrapak Member

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    I believe that the anti-halation layer in still films (except Kodachrome) is developer-soluble, that is the developer chemically changes the opaque part of the AH layer, rendering it transparent. The only film currently available without an AH layer is (IIRC) Efke IR820 Aura.
     
  10. Anon Ymous

    Anon Ymous Member

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    I'm not an expert either, but AFAIK, C41 films have the AH layer between the film base and the red sensitive (final) layer. It becomes transparent IIRC with development. If anybody knows specifically, I'd like to know.
     
  11. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    All Kodak films have an AH layer somewhere in the structure either below the emulsion layer or behind on the back. The motion picture films and Kodachrome use Rem-Jet as the AH layer and this must be removed in the process by a special method.

    The other films allow for removal in the process so with C-41, try soaking the film in bleach for about 5' at room temp, then wash 5', soak in fix 5' and wash 5' and then soak in stabilizer. This should remove the "stain" as the AH layer in some color films is gray silver which must be bleached out. If this does not work, repeat with longer times.

    PE
     
  12. Bohngy

    Bohngy Member

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    Thanks nickrapak, I'll give it a go with the dev, stop and wash process I was talking about.
    Ed - I'm not trying to invent an extra AH removal step, my developing technique, using tubes and not tray/tanks, is not removing all of the AH layer.... or the layer I BELIEVE to be the AH layer!

    either way, there's still something that's streaking across the film...
     
  13. Bohngy

    Bohngy Member

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    Thanks for your expert input PE, could I just do 5 mins in Blix at RT?
    thanks
     
  14. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Well, the RA Blix is about 50% or more weaker than the C41 bleach/fix so I would use 10 - 15 minutes and then a 10 minute wash and then stabilzer.

    PE
     
  15. Bohngy

    Bohngy Member

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    Many thanks for all your replies, especially Photo Engineer. I chose to soak each neg in developer 2 mins, Blix at room temp (5 min) then washed and stabilised... and I think the 'marks' have now disappeared, so I guess it was an anti-halation layer.

    One interesting observation is that I also have 2 cross processed sheets of Kodak EPP, one of the two exhibits the same 'streaks' - using the same technique as above, the streaks haven't disappeared!

    B&W seems easier at the mo!
     
  16. 3 Olives

    3 Olives Member

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    Efke IR820 Aura B&W Infrared does not have AH backing. No, I'm not smart - just happened to have found it out trying to find a film similar to HIE.
     
  17. 3 Olives

    3 Olives Member

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    I see where nickrapak pointed this out in an earlier post - proof that I wasn't lying when I said I'm not smart.
     
  18. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I don't know. In a gin martini you would be just about right! :D:D:D

    Steve
     
  19. OldBikerPete

    OldBikerPete Member

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    When I pre-soak my Kodak Portra 160VC in distilled water for 5 min in the rotating Jobo tank at 100F before replacing the pre-soak with developer, the pre-soak comes out colored a deep red/brown. I've always assumed that that was the anti-halation layer dissolved.
     
  20. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The color coming out during the prewash is mainly due to acutance dyes and trimmer dyes. The latter adjust the speeds of the 3 layers or trim them, to assure an exact speed to the film and an exact speed relationship between layers. The acutance dyes enhance sharpness by reducing the effects of turbidity in the coating.

    PE
     
  21. archer

    archer Member

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    Dear Bohngy;
    When processing film in smooth walled tubes I use fiberglass window screen between the film back and tube wall. Just cut some 4x5 pieces to fit and load the tube making certain that the screen is against the back of the film. The screen allows the chemicals to reach the entire film back and problem solved. Be sure to rinse and dry the screen before use.
    Denise Libby
     
  22. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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  23. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    ditto

    Steve
     
  24. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Thanks guys. I appreciate it and am glad to help.

    PE