How do I build a recessed lensboard?

Discussion in 'Camera Building, Repairs & Modification' started by EASmithV, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    I build lensboards out of cardboard for my cameras all the time, but I've never made a recessed lensboard, and I need one to use my 152mm Ektar on my 8x10. Do any of you have any easy tricks you know to make this easier?
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    You could use foam plates and stack rings of declining diameter, or built a tube, again using foam plates.
     
  3. SMBooth

    SMBooth Member

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    Poster tube, or PVC conduit with some 2 part epoxy to glue to flat panel..
     
  4. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

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    Anything goes. I used 4mm plywood to build a recessed board and it worked just fine.
    On the downside, compared to cardboard, you need a saw to cut it, but not very much more (just some glue), but on the upside it is more stable than cardboard and it stays in shape even if it gets wet.
    You just cut the board so it fits the camera, cut out a square (or circle if you prefer that) and build a box behind it and glue to the back of the front board.
    Make sure the hole in the front is big enough compared to the picture angle (and you have yourself a built in shade as well).

    As I said, anything goes and good luck.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hobby stores usually sell basswood for model makers ...
    you make a box with an edge ..
    miter cut the edges and glue the sides together, and
    then drill the (lens)hole in the middle.
    paint it black and you are good to go ...
    it won't take very long to make.
    basswood is very strong ..
    and if you feel you need it stronger,
    cross the grain, double up on it ...
    have fun!
    john
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 29, 2009
  6. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

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    I hope I'm not stating the obvious here but the 152mm Ektar is a great lens but it won't cover 8x10... maybe not quite 5x7. Are you using a reduction back? If so then this is perfectly practical.

    You can make a recessed lens board by adding a metal cone (perhaps from an old enlarger) to a flat board... assuming your boards are large enough to allow this. Just make sure it's large enough to get your fingers into so you can adjust the lens and small enough to clear the front standard's opening and allow for movements.
     
  7. Jesper

    Jesper Subscriber

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    The one I built was for a Angulon 90/6,8 that covers even less.
    When I did that, 8x10 was the smallest LF-camera I had and of course it didn't cover anything close to that, but I still needed to use the lens (I wanted a single coated wide angle lens for a picture).
    As long as you know what you get it can still be useful. If it helps you can cut ot the format you want from cardboard (panorama, square etc) and limit the image on the ground glass with this. Some negative area will of course be wasted.
    All a matter of the way you prefer to work, but Mike1234 is right, don't expect an 8x10 image from this lens.
     
  8. eli griggs

    eli griggs Member

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    If you have access to a drill press, a hole-saw or one of these are useful.

    Harbor Freight sells hole-saw sets for a very small amount, however if you buy a circle cutter, spend money on a quality tool.

    Eli