how do i refix prints?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by fluffy_penguins, Jan 25, 2008.

  1. fluffy_penguins

    fluffy_penguins Member

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    hi, i need to refix some old prints for a workshop tomorrow (hiya tim, fintan and thefizz)

    so i know i have to soak 'em 5 minutes, then plonk in some fresh fix, then wash.

    my question is ... can i do this with the regular lights on, or do i need a safe light? thks, and sorry if this is a dumb question,

    catherine
     
  2. Rob Archer

    Rob Archer Member

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    Not a dumb question at all! You can do it with the lights on ( depending on how badly fixed or not they were in the first place!) If they show signs of fading it's probably too late anyway.

    Rob
     
  3. fluffy_penguins

    fluffy_penguins Member

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    thanks for the speedy response!

    catherine
     
  4. tim rudman

    tim rudman Member

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    may I call you 'Fluffy'? ;-)
    Room light is fine
    Wash well though and hypoclear if you have the chance. Don't worry if you can't

    See you tomorrow
    Tim
     
  5. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Perhaps I misinterpret the question but to my
    mind the need to re-fix is due to silver halides
    retained in the emulsion. Such are sensitive
    to light and can print-out when exposed to
    light.

    I've deliberately under fixed and by so doing have
    produced very pleasant 'warm tone' papers of
    otherwise snow whites. Dan
     
  6. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    If I'm wrong, somebody please correct me, but if a paper is underfixed and therefore darkens when exposed to light, the damage will be done as soon as the print is exposed to light for enough time. Light present during a subsequent re-fixing will be irrelevant; AFAIK, the paper isn't any more sensitive to light during a second dunk in the fixer than it had been when exposed to light between fixes. Thus, the only case I can think of where re-fixing should be done under safelights is if the paper had never been exposed to normal lighting conditions.
     
  7. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    Au fait, have you re-fixed the print, once it acquired the adequate tone? I've noticed the same thing, but the warmth disappears in the fixer.
     
  8. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Not clear. I've noticed paper tones which can be
    described as pleasantly warm to very distractingly
    warm if under fixed. Those tones after fixing. Perhaps
    a useful technique for some one seeking a warm tone
    paper from an other wise snow white.

    Some papers are left with a dirty gray. Papers show
    color after fixing and some exposure to light. I've not
    tested but believe with no exposure no color. Dan
     
  9. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    But the resulting color is not permanent, right? It will eventually darken completely under exposure to light.
     
  10. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    I've not noticed any darkening. The paper is fixed
    but not completely. No reason it should take on more
    than a light shade of color if so fixed. Dan