How lenses are (were) made

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by AgX, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. AgX

    AgX Member

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  2. Sal Santamaura

    Sal Santamaura Member

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    Thank you for the link -- it was enjoyable to watch. I sorely miss vertically integrated companies and the high quality products they produced which, in my opinion, cannot be consistently matched with outsourcing. I also miss 20-bladed diaphragms like the one shown.

    I don't miss formal work attire. :D
     
  3. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Thank you. At about 2 minutes in, the building that I worked in is shown.
     
  4. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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    Very interesting, thanks. Got a real kick out of the "lens calculator." What a beast! :smile:
     
  5. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Wow ... it's really a staggering operation. What has happened to Kodak since then?

    I've always wondered what "tooling" the Russians carted off to Kiev after the war. I imagine they were machines such as these. I can see why it took years to set up.

    Thanks for posting!
     
  6. zsas

    zsas Member

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    Loved that part too! That must have been groundbreaking at the time!

     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Very interesting. Thanks.

    The first time I saw that I was at Konica and not Kodak. They used less automation but the same methods.

    PE
     
  8. AgX

    AgX Member

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  9. Rudolf Karachun

    Rudolf Karachun Subscriber

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    Interesting Thanks.
     
  10. zsas

    zsas Member

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    ^Neat'o. Thanks for the video and Zuse Z-22 info
     
  11. Jeff L

    Jeff L Subscriber

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    Interesting. Thanks!
    The Zuse Z-22? I think there's an app for that now...
     
  12. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    I watched the video and across the room is my 14" Kodak Commercial Ektar in shutter sleeping in the original wooden box which is shinny black with the Kodak emblem on it. It's like the saying. "how young we were" in the context of technology. So why use those lenses today? See the video and how much craftsmanship went into each and every one. How far apart is that Ektar from my iPhone that I watched it with?
     
  13. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    I'm sure lenses are still made with this sort of quality somewhere. It is sad that Americans are not allowed to make them any more ... at one time we led the world in so many things.

    I've been using a Kodak Medalist with one of those hand-made Ektars this last week. Excellent glass ...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2013
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  15. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Basically lenses are made the some way today, except of a bit more robotics, and those precision moulded lenses from plastic or glass-plastic hybrides. The most changes seem to be in the barrel-making. And most important, advanced computing technology.

    I rather see this film as a a very good educational film than as documentary of industry history.



    The modern version of this film would be this one:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=MKNFW0YwDYw

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=qzpt49qq6v4

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=6bQ3-DWh-rA
     
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  16. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Very interesting.

    Jeff
     
  17. zsas

    zsas Member

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    AgX - very true! After watching the modern day videos you have above I am left remembering the old saying:

     
  18. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    It surprises me that no one noticed that the Kodak clip showed them using an ANALOG computer! :D

    They were very accurate and ANALOG!

    PE
     
  19. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I knew, but somehow I did not found it worth mentioning.
    I'm living in the past anyway...

    ALL Zuse computers though, from 1938 on, were digital. His first one employed old used cine film for punched tape. Blasphemy!!! That's when the evil started!
     
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  20. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    I noticed the analog computer too, in that timeframe it would have been more accurate than most available digital computers.
     
  21. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I noticed the analog computer AND that it was probably filmed during WWII because most of the employees were women and the hair and dress styles.
     
  22. AgX

    AgX Member

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    The film reminded me of the similar Kodak film on film manufacture from 1958.
    I thought this lens making film to be from the 50's.

    Are there other other hints that Point to the 40's?

    -) the film starts with showing a Kodak Ektra
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2013
  23. AgX

    AgX Member

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    The British Film Institute dates this film of 1950.
     
  24. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    We used an analog computer for a number of things even up to the '70s.

    PE
     
  25. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    the Ektra was a pre- and post-war camera, but the real indicator that it is a 50s film is that it shows a guy using a Kodak Chevron to take pictures -- the Chevron followed the Medalist and was first produced in 1953...
     
  26. AgX

    AgX Member

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    So I mixed up the Ektra with a Chevron. Both are new to me, but I have to admit the Chevron fits much better to what I see on film.
    The British Film Institute is wrong. And I am finally right with my first impression of the film being from the 50's...


    Or will someone come up with a new proposal?