How many people in the world make wet plate photos on a regular basis?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by periclimenes, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. periclimenes

    periclimenes Member

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    Hi All,

    I'm a teacher and one of my students asked me how many people in the world make true wet plate photos on a regular basis. I had no idea, so I defer to your wisdom. 100? 1,000? 10,000?

    What's your best guess?

    Thanks...
     
  2. Sean

    Sean Admin Staff Member

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  3. periclimenes

    periclimenes Member

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    I've been trying (unsucessfully) to join that forum. I sent the moderator an e-mail as per the instructions, but I have not heard anything back.

    Thanks for the reply.
     
  4. rwyoung

    rwyoung Member

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    Quinn is a busy man. :smile: Give him a little time. If it has been a week, ping him again. He'll get it done.

    And enjoy the forum when you get in!
     
  5. smieglitz

    smieglitz Subscriber

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    My guess would be less than 1000 worldwide making plates on a regular (or seasonal) basis. I think a lot of the members of both collodion forums haven't picked it up yet. Mosts of the posts are made by the same core group so there are a lot of lurkers who don't practice the process yet. Maybe 30-40 folks show up at John Coffer's annual Tintype Jamboree. He's holding 6 or so workshops/year with 4 in each workshop. Then there's the Ostermans, Will Dunniway, Eric Taubman, Kerik, Michael Mazzeo, Quinn Jacobson and few others holding workshops on a less regular basis. So, the ranks aren't growing too fast though there has been an acceleration lately.

    In Michigan, I know of myself and 5 others who currently make plates, and 2 retired from it. I'd bet there are more, but I don't know how many or where they are in the state.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 13, 2008
  6. eddie gunks

    eddie gunks Member

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    i am going to join some day soon.....i am just tryingto get my head around VDB and kallitype bofroe i dive in.
     
  7. Zebra

    Zebra Member

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    I shoot wet plate in formats ranging from 5 x 7, full plate, 10 x 12 and when I refuse to take my medication 20 x 24. Gotta go, nurse ratcheds coming down the hall.

    Zebra
     
  8. Removed Account

    Removed Account Member

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    I will be adding one more to the total as soon as I receive Quinn's book and order the chemicals. He did take a week or two to get back to me about joining the forum, but considering he tracked me down to PM me on APUG and has to set up all the accounts manually I'd say that's not a bad turn-around.
     
  9. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council

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    I'm adding wet-plate to my repertoire this year also - just a matter of scheduling time with an instructor.
     
  10. colrehogan

    colrehogan Member

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    I'd love to, but until I have a properly ventilated area to do it in, I will stick to reading about it.
     
  11. rwyoung

    rwyoung Member

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    Way more fun in a poorly vented area! Ether, gun-cotton, Everclear, Potassium Cyanide, open flame! What could be better? ;-)
     
  12. Brook

    Brook Member

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    One thing for the OP is that there are still at least some wetplate practioners in the third world, primarly ( i think) the middle east. These are often street photographers peddeling little tintypes. I met a photographer from Egypt who told me this is still fairly common as the chemistry is still cheap and avaliable.

    I just did a shoot using an old bank vault (read no ventilation) as a makeshift darkroom. I wont work without ventilation again.
     
  13. Ty G

    Ty G Guest

    If the list includes the guys who use modern darkrooms, lights, cameras, enlargers, aluminum plates etc., then yes it may be over 1000. But if the list is to include only the guys who try to remain as historically correct as possible, then the list may only be 100 or so.

    Ty G
    www.tystintypes.com
     
  14. Quinn

    Quinn Subscriber

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    Greetings,

    First; access to the COLLODION.COM FORUM - Mr. Young is correct, I've been very busy and my junk mail filter is over active - I think several people have sent emails to join the board and the filter grabbed them (my apologies) - to resolve that, go here http://www.collodion.com/contact.asp and send me your info, I'll get it and I'll get you on the forum.

    Secondly, I believe there are fewer people working in wet plate on a "regular" basis than most think (but it is growing very fast). Most people, I would say 80-90%, that attend a workshop never make a plate at home. A few attempt the process, but most never get setup (equipment, etc.) or never get a handle on the chemistry (can't purchase it, mix it etc). Those that do go on to make images on their own are, relatively speaking, few. There are even fewer who can show you work produced in the last two weeks (at any give time); that's how I would define "regular basis" - producing work as you would with film or other image producing techniques.

    However, I may be totally off of the mark and completely up in the night - I usually am.
     
  15. Removed Account

    Removed Account Member

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    Thanks for the update Quinn! I got your book in from Amazon the other day, have read it cover to cover and and now putting together my first chemistry order. I'll keep everyone posted on my progress! :D
     
  16. Kerik

    Kerik Member

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    I agree with Quinn's assessment. And, for me, this would include anyone using the wet plate collodion process, regardless of "historical correctness". Those concerned with historical correctness are a much smaller number are generally involved in the reencatment crowd. Most of us using the process to make art aren't concerned with those issues and are happy to use whatever modern tools and materials will facilitate the results we're after.
     
  17. Anton Lukoszevieze

    Anton Lukoszevieze Subscriber

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    wet plate

    I would love to do wet plate. I couldn't imagine doing it just on a workshop basis. It would have to be reasonably regular and definite aesthetic decision. I know it may be complicated, but then so is learning Lithuanian (next thing on the list..........) Kerik's work is amazing.
     
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    Removed Account Member

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    One MSDS I have found for ethyl ether states that a potential side-effect of the ether is "Psychic Disturbance." I think I know what they mean but using the word "psychic" makes it sound like the ghost of Frederick Scott Archer will visit me after breathing too many ether fumes.

    - Justin
     
  19. FrederickScottArcher

    FrederickScottArcher Member

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    And that is a problem, young man?
     
  20. JamesMadison

    JamesMadison Member

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    I've noticed most of the people who demand "historical correctness" only practice "historical correctness" at their convenience. Yet they are quick to point out the incorrectness of others.
     
  21. bsdunek

    bsdunek Subscriber

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    BOOM!!!
    When I had my tonsils out many years ago (about 65) Ether was what they used to put you out. Never hurt me. Now, if I can just find that long lost shaker of salt...