How much of this was done in the darkroom vs. studio?

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by BetterSense, Sep 1, 2009.

  1. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

    Messages:
    3,127
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Location:
    North Caroli
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2009
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,034
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Most is done with the lighting, look at the face, chest, and shoulder etc. Tose photographers were masters of Hollywood style lighting and set building.

    Ian
     
  3. Mike1234

    Mike1234 Inactive

    Messages:
    1,884
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    Location:
    South Texas,
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Lighting should always do all or most of the work. There's nothing more satisfying than to have crafted the light so well that burning/dodging really aren't needed... straight print. That said, life doesn't always work this way. "Some" DR tweaking is usually needed.
     
  4. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,814
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There is one other technique that may also be involved - retouching the negative.

    The retoucher's art is one that was practised much more routinely in days gone by.

    Matt
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,983
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i guess it could be done with heavy darkroom manipulation or
    negative retouching, but probably it was just someone who
    knew how to use his lights ..

    side lights + key
    background light
    hair lights

    the left side lights her face / key
    and you can see the shadow of her arm on her leg
    the right side light fills gives form to her right side and legs
    she looks up to the hair light
    and the other background light is behind her projecting up
    and moves her away from the background.
    which is a few feet behind her ...
    (no shadows on the background from the other lights )

    this kind of lighting was typical of the 30s-60s in most portrait studios.

    the person i worked for did this sort of thing ( multiple lights &C )
    - sans the starlet and the starlet pose -
    all the time even in the 80s ...
     
  6. Angelo di Mango

    Angelo di Mango Member

    Messages:
    79
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Location:
    BOURGOIN-JALLIEU, France
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    There is a flah head equipped with a fresnel glass which is placed right behind the model and aimed at the background .
    The fresnel glass enables to focalise the light as you would do with a torch light only much much more accurately and with a much nicer effect of course!!
     
  7. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    17,941
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    That's a George Hurrell photo that I linked to in another thread. Most of what you're seeing was done with lighting (Hurrell always used hot lights, not strobes), but you can be sure there was retouching on the neg for the face and possibly the other highlight areas.

    As a general moderation reminder, please don't hotlink images on sites that aren't yours using the IMG tag. Just provide a clickable link. Hotlinks can overtax someone else's bandwidth and can raise copyright issues.