How old is this film?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by ektachrome, Jul 8, 2012.

  1. ektachrome

    ektachrome Member

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    Hi guys
    Just got an old 100ft roll of Ektachrome.
    It does not have an expiry date.
    Does anyone know when this film is from?
    Also, what ISO should I shoot at?
    The picture is attached
    Thanks
    Ektachrome:smile:
     

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  2. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

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    I would load a short load of maybe 20 exposures and test by using different ISO settings on the camera.
    Either set up a scene, or choose one to photograph. make 2 or 3 exposures at EI 25, then 2 or 3 at 50, then 20 or 3 at 100, then finally at 200.
    After processing youwil be able to easily decide which is better for this roll of film. As for the expiration date, I can't help you.
     
  3. kerne

    kerne Member

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    Ektachrome Professional 200 EPD (5036). Judging by the label, possibly from the early 80's. Will be interesting to see how much color shift there is since I see there's another one for sale up on the 'bay and the seller doesn't say how it was stored.
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    It looks like Extachrome 5036 which is ISO 200.

    Steve
     
  5. Bronica645

    Bronica645 Member

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    Since it is a higher (200) ISO (ASA) Film & outdated by easily 25 years, the Film lost a considerable amount of speed.
    I would start at 100 ISO & work down to as low as 3 ISO ( as B&W Infrared Film), expect a heavy color shift also.
    Doesn't hurt to experiment, although I wouldn't photograph a important assignment with it.
     
  6. wogster

    wogster Member

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    It's marked E4 this was phased out in 1976, when the less toxic E6 process took over, that means your film is at least 36 years old, although it could be considerably older. The label style would be common to that age of film. The E4 process is no longer available, if you want to use the film, your probably best to try a B&W negative process, although if it's a faster film it could be fogged to the point of no longer being usable.
     
  7. kerne

    kerne Member

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    [​IMG]

    It's E-6.
     
  8. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    If you search NASA gov , you can find many earth shots by astronouts but all the pictures links were lost , they classified these pictures with mission number I searched by bottom 7..... something number.
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    It looked like E-8 to me, but I knew it could not be that. I was sure that it was not E-4.

    Steve
     
  10. ektachrome

    ektachrome Member

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    It is definitely E6.
    Thanks for the ideas.
    When my SLR is fixed, I will experiment.
    Can anyone suggest a starter ISO?
    Thanks
    Ektachrome:smile:
     
  11. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    As Bronica645 has said above, just experiment over a wide range....it's easy, just expose a test film of a single subject, say a sunlit building, in 1/3 stop increases starting at 200 ISO, working right down to 8 ISO or less. A 24 exp length will be more than enough for this, and the result will give you an accurate guide for further tests, and also confirm the general condition of the film as regards color casts or fogging given the ago.
    (All Ektachrome 200 is/was E-6. The old "High Speed Ektachrome" (Daylight version 160 ASA, or Type B 125 ASA) was E-4.)
     
  12. wogster

    wogster Member

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    I stand corrected, looked like a 4 to me though on the original pic.
     
  13. newcan1

    newcan1 Subscriber

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    I played with a lot of different outdated film stocks. I would suggest starting at 12 ASA and doing bracketed exposures up to say ASA 100. Keep notes. I'll betcha it comes in at 25-50 ASA or thereabouts.

    If the colors are awful, try using it as b&w negative film.