How to Balance This Color Negative Print?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by RedSun, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    Can someone help to see how to color balance this print from color negative? It is a Fuji Super C from a Kodak color negative. This is 1/2 of a 5x7 print with F16 and exposure time 6.6 seconds with a Saunders 4550. Actually the real print looks nicer than the scan. The scan looks cooler.

    I still have the original shop print. Compared to the original print, the red dress is too dark. The actual color is super bright red, not dark red. The face color is also warmer.

    I can change skin color and make the print warmer, but I just can't make the red brighter.

    What can I do? The paper is known to be good.

    img019.jpg
     
  2. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    The sky is the give-a-way. It is has a heavy cyan cast (or at least it does looking at it on my screen) I don't know what filtration units your enlarger is callibrated in, but if it is in Kodak units I would start of by removing 10 units of magenta and 10 units of yellow. As cyan is the opposite of red this should correct your problem and brighten up the reds. If it still isn't correct remove another 5 units of each, or if you have gone too far ADD 5 units of each. You are not bound by any protocol to remove 10's or 5's in units you can remove or add whatever you wish, even singles if you are prepared to fiddle.

    You will of course have to do test strips again and consider over exposure will alter the balance so it has to be correct.
     
  3. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    Is the current print also a little over-exposed?

    I tried color viewing filter and it does not help much. I'll adjust the color filters to see if it improves.

    The ColorStar I use gives me very good starting point. But it only analyzes the areas the probe is on. This is a good way to understand the colors more...
     
  4. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    You can try what BMbikerider says as it does look cyanish but for what it is worth I has a print from a mini-lab and tried to replicate it with various combos of Y and M and home RA4 processing and I could not get it to match the mini lab print exactly.

    Once you have the red dress and skin tones near to what you'd like I'd stop there. Exact matching could be the quest for the Holy Grail and use a lot of paper.

    pentaxuser
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The image was shot with 2 illuminants. Therefore, this image will never be in full balance. The foreground is reddish and the background is bluish. The best you can do is dodge with color filters after you get some part of the image correct.

    PE
     
  6. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    Here are the scans from lab and from my test print. Somehow, the Epson V700 gives a cooler looking than the actual photos. The original lab photos looks very bright, particularly the red dress. I believe the test print looks yellow with the red dress, skin tone and the sky. I'm not sure if that is the Cyan color. It could be both.

    img019.jpg img020.jpg
     
  7. wogster

    wogster Member

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    The normal question, really is, is the dress or skin tone on the lab print correct? It does look more plausible that it could be correct, but without seeing the original scene it's hard to tell.
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The print on the right has a magenta colored floor and everything in the background is blue.

    As I said, this one may be impossible to balance. And, you might succeed by dividing the image into zones such as sky, background and foreground. Use colored filters and dodge these as needed. For example the background may need no work at all, but the foreground should change as in the right example. Then the sky can be made blue.

    Only by a zone method can you fix this problem properly.

    PE
     
  9. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    This is an early evening in Disney. I think it had some rain early in the day. The front (girl) was shot with a Nikon flash. So the front and back look different.

    I like the tone of the foreground and can care less about the background. The problem is that I still can't re-create the original bright red color. I have the same problem with several other prints (different rolls of films).

    I also tried it on Photoshop (color balance), but still no success. I do not really know I should further change the color filters, or I should try different print paper.

    The original Kodak film is about 9 year old and it has been stored in good condition.