How to Carry my 4x5 Sinar?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by RedSun, May 28, 2014.

  1. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    I have a Sinar P2 and F2. I'll probably leave P2 inside and carry the F2 with me. I have both the Lightware V4000 and the Sinar metal case for the F2. The Lightware may be lighter to carry.

    And I need some cart to carry the case. I'm open to all suggestions. I know there may be many choices. I'm still not sure if I'd plan to carry the Sinar on a trail or to the mountain. I'll pack one or two more lenses, 5-10 film holder, filter pack and a tripod.
     
  2. yurisrey

    yurisrey Member

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    How to carry a 4x5 Sinar?

    With pride.
     
  3. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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    I have a Sinar F2. Even though F stands for "field", in my opinion, it's not a field camera. I love my F2 and used it for over 30 years. My F2 came with a hard case that held the camera, an extra bellows, slot for 2 lens boards. It's too heavy for me to carry on a trail. I would consider a folding view camera instead of a rail camera. You won't have the DOF scales or the swing and tilt calculators of a Sinar.
     
  4. dorff

    dorff Member

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    You don't, and let the mule carry it instead. Seriously, though, there are cameras better suited to field work than a Sinar, some of which will cost less than a mule.
     
  5. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i like using a tenba car case.
    its handy for cameras with rails ( you can put it upside rail across the top, body in the middle compartment )
    it has a padded lens case for your lenses, and enough space to put EVERYTHING you need in there
    film holders, dark cloth, meters, lenses, flask of booze, monocular / binocular viewer, compendium &c ... and it really isn't too hard to carry.
    i use the 2 handles because the shoulder strap doesn't really come in handy. before the house fell on me ... maybe but not now.
     
  6. greenbank

    greenbank Member

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    On another forum there were several advocates of either a baby buggy (sometimes with the baby seat removed) or a 3-wheel bicycle trailer, for use as hand-pulled trail carts. Either would easily be up the weight and bulk.

    Baby buggies have hand-brakes, and proper handles oriented correctly for pushing and pulling. Bike trailers generally carry the weight much lower (more important on rough ground) and are a little cheaper.

    Or - as already suggested in this thread - get an assistant who can't complain.
     
  7. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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    I'm looking for a small pull-over, like the one you use to carry one suitcase. So I can at least use it from my car to client's site... I do not want to carry it in my hand.

    I agree that Sinar is heavy...
     
  8. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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  9. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    I have my F in a Lowepro backpack. I can fit the F (compressed onto a 6" rail), two 12" extension rails, two lenses, and light meter in the backpack, and then carry my film holders and spare film in a Calumet belt pouch designed for 4x5 holders.
     
  10. RedSun

    RedSun Member

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  11. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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  12. Jim Rice

    Jim Rice Member

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    “A mule will labor ten years willingly and patiently for you, for the privilege of kicking you once. ”

    ~William Faulkner
     
  13. WayneStevenson

    WayneStevenson Member

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    My Sinar is marketed to fit into a briefcase. Heh.

    But I lug it around in a pelican case with wheels. And there is an outfit around that sells backpack harnesses to go onto the case. Not for me. But then again, I've never lugged my Sinar anywhere except back and forth between my house and my studio.

    But I typically put my Calumet or Toyo View on the end of my tripod, spare shirt around tripod as shoulder padding, and huck the whole thing over my shoulder.
     
  14. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

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  15. Rick Rosen

    Rick Rosen Member

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    For a monorail camera the Sinar F is quite compact. I gave seminars for Sinar but I never liked their official brief case for the F because you had to take the camera apart.

    You can fold the camera and drop it into a backpack which is what I did in the field.

    Steps:

    1. Move the two standards to the ends of the 12" rail.
    2. Loosen the bellows from the rear standard. Leave it attached to the front standard.
    3. Fold the rear standard down by loosening the tilt knob. Once it is resting just above the rail tighten the knob.
    4. Fold the front standard down and compress the bellows against the rear standard and ground glass back. Lock it down with the tilt knob.

    I always removed the lens and stored it.