How to develope slighty underexposed film..

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by bibowj, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. bibowj

    bibowj Member

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    This may be a pretty simple question, but I wanted to ask anyways.

    I did a (for fun) shoot of a surfer the other day, and Ive found that of the 4 rollls of b/w Ive shot, the 2 Ive developed have been underexposed. Probaly a stop. Mostly due to me metering in average, and the subject being a little back lit. I havent processed the other 2 rolls, but the first 2 Ive having a bear of a time getting a good scan out of it. Theres details in the black, but its just too mucky... so, I would like to try to salvage the other rolls if I can.

    How should I process these next rolls if I want to up the exposure a little?


    (the film is Across 100)


    THanks!
     
  2. Juraj Kovacik

    Juraj Kovacik Member

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    I would try to develop the third roll for longer time - 10 to 15 percent - using a bit higher temperature of developer. Just a bit, like 21 degree of Celsius if the first two rolls were developed in 20 degree.
     
  3. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    I'd just go to the directions for the film/developer you are using and use the info for a 1-stop push.
     
  4. bibowj

    bibowj Member

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    Im shooting Across 100 and souping it in xtol...

    So would I read the directions for as if i shot it at 50 or 200?
     
  5. Ottrdaemmerung

    Ottrdaemmerung Member

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    Use the development time for 200. That's a one-stop push.
     
  6. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    +1
     
  7. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    (+2) You should be able to make good prints with the one stop under exposure. Make some test prints at different contrasts and possibly you need to expose different parts of the image with different contrast filters as well as some burning and/or dodging might be needed .

    http:www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  8. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    I don't think the OP does any darkroom printing. He will scan his negs after he has got info on how to improve on developing underexposed negs

    pentaxuser
     
  9. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Sounds more like a 1.5-2 stop underexposure to me. IME, cameras usually meter that much off with backlit subjects on auto setting, especially with water scenes. You don't say what developer you use, but I would try D-76 stock for 10-13 minutes at 20c.
     
  10. bibowj

    bibowj Member

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    I do both... I will be printing these AND scanning them. Im going to try and print as well today, and I imagine that with test prints, I can get a good print...but Ive just not been able to get a good scan out of them, no matter what I do..

    I use Xtol at full strength normally..
     
  11. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Post-exposure latensification is your only hope. Increasing development time does not do it.
     
  12. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    Looks at the negs.
    Do your processed rolls contain any detail in the shadows you want?

    If there is detail there it will optically print with some dodging.
     
  13. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    Increase the time. It will not put more detail in the darks, but will increase contrast making scanning easier. developing longer for underexposed negs does not get the same results as proper exposure development, but it does make printing easier.

    I would use selenium toner 1:3 on the existing rolls to bring up contrast.

    Microfine will get more speed out, maybe 2/3 stop, but you really need to make more underexposed negs and test them before committing "money" shots.
     
  14. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    A one stop under exposure is within the latitude of the film. There is no need to make any adjustments to your usual developing method.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 10, 2011
  15. bibowj

    bibowj Member

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    Hey everyone- thanks so much for your help. I did what was suggested and the negatives were salvaged. So much in fact, that I by passed scanning and spent 5 hours wet printing...and i have to admit, Im not sure how to make the scan look as good as that went print does!
    so thanks agaiN!
     
  16. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    The proof is always in the printing!