How to display large format slides

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by Existing Light, Dec 16, 2009.

  1. Existing Light

    Existing Light Member

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    I've been wanting to start shoting large format for some time now, and I think I'm about to take the dive. I shot 35mm slides in my color photography class and found looking at slides in a dark room to be rather addictive. Perhaps I'm fascinated because slides are new to me (it's all been black and white prints and prints of scanned of color negatives until recently).

    I would like to shoot some large format slides when I finally find enough money to buy a large format camera. I'm just not sure of the best way to display large format slides. I've seen 4x5 slide projectors on ebay, and I'm sure there are 8x10 slide projectors out there (if not please correct me :smile: ).

    At a chinese resturaunt in or near Anniston, Alabama, there was a big picture framed on a wooden box that hung on the wall (the picture was likw 2feet x 3feet, if i remember correctly). Within the box was a light that illuminated the picture (perhaps frame is a better term than box). Was that a framed slide? If so, where would I get a frame like that or where can I find out how to make it myself?
     
  2. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    What you saw in the restaurant was most likely an Ilfochrome (Cibachrome). It's basically slide film (in that it is a positive process) but it's designed to be printed to instead of directly exposed in-camera. You shoot whatever slide and develop it, put it in your enlarger and put Ilfochrome under the enlarger. It can be displayed on a lightbox as you saw, or viewed reflectively like a normal print.
     
  3. Existing Light

    Existing Light Member

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    Thanks Polyglot. Ilfochrome came to mind the first time I saw it, but I've never seen an Ilfochrome before (At least I didnt realize I saw one), so I didnt know.
     
  4. Anon Ymous

    Anon Ymous Member

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    Kodak makes transparent Endura RA4 materials.
     
  5. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    As said before, Ilfochrome is available as a transparency material, as is Kodak Duratrans for RA-4. Both come as large rolls meant to be used in a lightjet or lambda machine from a digital file, and both are available with a clear support for light boxes that have their own diffuser, or with a translucent white support for lightboxes without a built in diffuser. Several artists, such as Jeff Wall and Thomas Struth have their prints made on these materials and backlit for display in galleries or museums. They shoot large format, scan the film and have it printed and mounted in the box elsewhere. You can use either of these materials at home, but since they are only sold in rolls, it is pricey.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    That was likely an RA ("type C" or "chromogenic") print made on transparent film, though it could have been an Ilfochrome ("type R" or "dye destruction") print on the same sort of material, as both types are available. The RA is much more common; available from any pro lab, while only a few labs still do Ifochrome printing. To my knowledge, both are still available in either crystal clear or diffusion-base versions.
     
  7. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Also Agfa still offers RA-4 clear base material (only 10" wide though).
     
  8. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    A restaurant would be much more likely to use something like Duratrans print film (meaning a negative film designed for precisely such displays) than Ilfochrome transparency, which is more expensive and much less common.

    Occasionally I've displayed 8x10" transparencies temporarily using a thin Logan light pad, which is designed for such use.
     
  9. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    Where do they market it? It's not sold at B&H.
     
  10. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Agfa decided to get rid of their "consumer imaging" branch and so they did in 2004, so they won't sell anything via B&H and such but they still have their different "industrial" ranges and there you find this 10" film/sheets in their "aerial" range (Avitone CP 94).

    The other materials named above are probably more easy to get, but I wanted to hint at the fact that there still is some variety on the market
     
  11. Existing Light

    Existing Light Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys. Reading the responses has got me interested in doing something like this. Hopefully I'll get around to it soon :smile:



    David, if i'm reading this right, you displayed the actual transparencies you shot in your camera? Would it be possible to permanently display a large format slide using a lightbox?
     
  12. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes, I've displayed original transparencies that way. I'd have some concern about fading with long term display of an original color transparency. Maybe a solution to that would be UV absorbent glass on both sides of the transparency.
     
  13. Existing Light

    Existing Light Member

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    I didnt think about fading. If I contact printed a large format black and white negative on to a black and white and created a black and white positive, would that possibly work "better" than a color transparency? By "Better," I mean would black and white film deteriorate faster than a color transparancy, assuming they're both processed properly?

    The HP5+ I've shot in 35mm has a slight bluish purple tint to it. I'm assuming it would have the same color in 8x10 as well (correct me if i'm wrong). If so, that's the only drawback I can think of with the exception of possible fading/deteriorating. Maybe if I could use that as a creative effect...

    My imagination is going wild today :D
     
  14. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    More fixing and washing will generally get rid of the tint from your negs. But if you print to HP5, you're going to have to develop it pretty hard to get enough contrast. And the base won't be as clear as a dedicated printing material.

    B&W film (and paper) should not fade from light, but oxygen and sulfides will attack the silver. If laminated or bathed in Sistan, it should last on display for decades. You can tone as well but that has colour effects you may find undesirable.