How to expose properly with a yashica D??

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Photofidelity, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. Photofidelity

    Photofidelity Member

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    I was wondering if anyone knows how to expose properly with a yashica D? It doesn't have a build in light meter and, I currently don't have a hand held light meter. I really want to use this camera but I don't want to waste film trying out experiments. I have heard of the sunny 16 rule but I have never tried it because I tend to shoot at night?? any help would be great!

    Thanks, Meg
     
  2. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

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    A good overview-
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm

    And a little pocket calculator-
    http://expomat.tripod.com/

    Do a search for 'EV' or exposure value and you'll find various descriptions of various lightings. In general it is pretty consistent from source to source. Daylight is quite consistent. Artificial and night lighting, I can't help you much, sorry.

    You can also use most digital cameras as light meters if you have one.
     
  3. Photofidelity

    Photofidelity Member

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  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    You might look around for a Russian Leningrad meter, these are small and remarkably cheap. I have one that came in a barch of darkroom equipment about 9 years ago and only began using it this Spring after testing it against a Luna Pro which it matched fairly well. Actually it's now on loan to another APUG member who's using it with his Yashica :D

    They often sell for less than £10/$16.

    Ian

    Ian
     
  5. Katier

    Katier Member

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    and still going strong Ian although it's being used alongside a 'blad I've borrowed from Uni at the moment :smile:
     
  6. Mark Antony

    Mark Antony Member

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    The Leningrad was a good cheap meter as was the Weston Master V which can be found on Evil bay for pennies...
    Mark
     
  7. jime11

    jime11 Member

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  8. jime11

    jime11 Member

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    Here's a photo taken with my wife's Yashica D. This was taken several years ago using the exposure recommendations printed on the box. The 5x5 print was scanned on my flatbed. But still representative.


    scan0038.jpg
     
  9. Greg Campbell

    Greg Campbell Member

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    If you want to go Old School, grab a Selenium meter off Ebay for ten bucks.
    Make sure the seller describes it as operational. The meter needle mechanism of a decades-old meter can get gooped up.

    Here's a site describing a number of models.
    http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meters/meters/agfa_lucimeter_s.html
    More general info, including instructions, etc. at http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meters/index.html

    I found a Weston IV at a camera show for 3 bucks. It's accurate and works great for most subjects, although I'd hesitate to rely on it to meter a high contrast scene shot with slide film.

    Any of the meters on the above site will be more accurate than a 'sunny 16' guesstimate.

    As mentioned, most any digital or film camera can be used to generate an accurate aperture/shutter combination for your MF beast. I use my T90 and it's wonderful multi-spot meter when shooting my MF and 4x5 cameras. The results are dead-on, even when shooting transparencies.

    -Greg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 25, 2009