How to fix lens flare on Rokkor 58mm 1.4?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by stevco, Apr 28, 2010.

  1. stevco

    stevco Member

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    Hi,

    I am using Minolta SRT 101 with 58mm 1.4 and i am happy from the sharpness, colors, contrast etc, and since i am using this lens quite often i want to add a lens hood for this lens and to improve the images.

    I am shooting mostly portraits, people, family etc with this lens and i don't want to have huge lens flare because of the open aperture, and i am getting lens flare even when the sun comes from the side (as on pictures #1 and #3 in the attachment).

    I found out that the original lens hood for this 55mm filter size is D55NA hood.

    Where i can buy that hood, on what price (if someone knows), and is there a chance that some other hoods might fit the lens?

    Also, is clever buying a UV filter for the same lens? Will it change something. And if i need one, which UV filter should be good?

    I attached some examples.

    thanx in advance.
    Stevco.

    P.S. - I found this 55mm UV filter SIGMA, would it fit on my lens? http://pixplus.com.mk/index.aspx?ta...ctid=479&directoryid=+173&ctrl=productdetails
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2010
  2. martyryan

    martyryan Member

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    Any after market 55mm lens hood should work fine for this lens, that is what I did for my copy, and as much as I like the lens it is prone to flare.

    Marty
     
  3. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    As for the UV filter, if you are already having flare problems you will be providing two more surfaces from which the flare can show itslef, thus worsening the problem. UV filters have 'some' value but were mostly cheap upsells from sellers of lenses. Handy for a newbie that doesn't pay close attention to their gear in transit. Not at all necessary for a more experienced photographer.
     
  4. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I buy rubber collapsable hoods for my lenses. That way they can be folded back out of the way if necessary, and a quick flip pop it out for use. Make sure you get a decent quality one so it doesn't tear easily.
     
  5. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    A hood will help tremendously, also, just being more conscious of where you point your camera will make the biggest difference. In all your examples, the sun is obviously very near to your frame, and thus, unavoidable flare, probably even with a good hood.
     
  6. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    Here's the ticket. They work great for all focal lengths from 50mm to 135mm. Vignettes a little with wider lenses, despite the description. Inexpensive, and reasonably good quality. At that price, get a few. They have lens caps too. Again, reasonably good quality and inexpensive. Consider these items as consumables because inevitably they get lost or damaged no matter how good they are. Order $23 worth of stuff and shipping is free.

    Forget the UV filters. That's just asking for more flare.


    http://www.camerafilters.com/detail.aspx?ID=2721
     
  7. stevco

    stevco Member

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    Thank you all,
    I will search for some 55mm rubber lens hood.
     
  8. dynachrome

    dynachrome Member

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    Rokkor 58mm f/1.4 flare

    The 58/1.4 has nice bokeh and is a generally good standard lens. I have two of them. It's always advisable to use a hood with a fast lens. The issue here is that the coating on the 58/1.4 is not as advanced as the coating on later standard Rokkors. All of the 50/1.7 Rokkors are well coated and all of the 50/1.4 Rokkors are also well coated. I most cases I block flare by shading the lens with one hand. That's just laziness because I have many hoods. In most cases where flare is an issue the light is fairly strong. I would look for an inexpensive 50/1.7 Rokkor (MC Rokkor X, MC Rokkor PF, MD Rokkor-X or MD) and use that in flare prone situations.
     
  9. Ralph Javins

    Ralph Javins Member

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    Good morning, Stevco;

    You are correct in thinking that the first line of defense with lens flare is a good close fitting lens hood. You can use any of the normal lens hoods that will screw into a 55mm diameter by 0.75 mm thread pitch filter ring. I have a couple of folding rubber ones by the Hama people that I like to use with mine. The lens hoods that I have from Minolta are a slip-on mount that secure with a threaded screw that clamps from the side of the mounting ring. Yes, they are more expensive.

    I do have a few samples of the ROKKOR 1:1.4 f=58mm lenses, beginning with an early AUTO ROKKOR-PF and going to the MC ROKKOR-PF. They were made from 1961 to 1973. Minolta changed to the MC ROKKOR PG 1:1.4 f=50mm in 1973. Minolta was one of the earliest companies to use multicoating on their lenses beginning in the late 1950's. They continually developed their coating process and implemented changes and updating to that process when they believed that they had something better. They did not wait until a "model change" or a "model year end" to improve the coating process. Yes, the coatings on the later MD series lenses are even better than the ones on the MC series lenses. However, the main defense is still keeping the sun and other bright lights off the front of the lens.

    Regarding the SIGMA or any other brand UV filter, including B+W and Heliopan, if you are doing critical work, and there is no danger to the lens, do not use the filter on the front of the lens. It is another glass element in the optical path with two more lens surfaces for reflections. However, if you are in an atmosphere that may not be safe for the lens surfaces (blowing sand, smoke, vapors, rain, et cetera) then leaving a UV or Skylight filter on the front of the lens may be prudent. Many of the better filters are also multicoated, such as the Hoya HMC series, for example. For most of the photographs we may be taking, the UV or Skylight filter will make no noticeable difference in the print if you keep direct light off its surface just as you would with the front element of the lens. Again, flare control is still important, and the use of a lens hood (filter hood?) is still a very good idea.

    One justification I can offer for a metallic lens hood is the ability to absorb much of the shock if you drop the camera. I have had to replace a hood that gave its all in saving the lens and body from damage. I do not know if the folding rubber lens hoods can offer similar protection under all circumstances.
     
  10. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    I've had good luck on E-Bay or KEH dot com with lens hoods. Also, a professional camera shop should have a wide selection of screw-on generic-brand lens hoods. I would only use a filter if I was using a lens hood, for the reason the fellow above mentioned.
     
  11. C A Sugg

    C A Sugg Member

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    I don't have much experience with that lens but using it for night street shooting I've found that it will produce every artifact imaginable -- and some that aren't -- like distant traffic lights creating "donut holes" like a mirror lens. These were mostly wide open, using HP5+ kicked up to 1600. It is nice and sharp, but the contrast seems rather low. That's not really a bad thing as it can boost shadows.
    I also have an MC Rokkor-X PG, that I think dates from about 1975. The flair control with that one is stunning.