how to fog film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by steveb533, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. steveb533

    steveb533 Member

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    Hi,
    I was reading about developing c41 in b.w developer first, stopping, then fogging it and developing in normal c41. How do you fog it? Is that a chemical process or do you just expose it to light?

    Thanks,
    Steve
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Reread the information. What you have posted is incorrect. Sorry.

    PE
     
  3. steveb533

    steveb533 Member

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    Ok, thanks. Yes, that thread was on processing e6. I thought there was a similar method for c41; I accidentally developed a roll in b/w developer and have been looking for the best way to save it.
     
  4. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    Exactly what have you done, dev only, stop, fix? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
     
  5. steveb533

    steveb533 Member

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    I developed and stopped with water . I havent fixed it yet.
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Ok, here is how to proceed.

    Fix and wash. You now have a B&W record of the color image.

    Now, bleach in a rehal bleach with Ferricyanide and Bromide.

    Wash well and treat with a sodium sulifte clearing bath. Wash again.

    Now, run it through the C41 process in the light after fogging the film totally. You will have a reasonably good color image depending on how well the B&W process was conducted.

    OTOH, just fix and scan what you now have and you will have B&W images.

    PE
     
  7. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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  8. Photo Engineer

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    Guys;

    I assure you that rehal bleaching and then processing in C41 will give "normal" images, at least to the extent that the B&W process developed the layers. If the layers were under or over developed by the B&W process, then the color will not be true.

    The couplers will not be harmed by the rehal process, but the overall image quality such as grain and detail will suffer.

    PE
     
  9. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

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    +1

    You can get "perfectly fine" (scannable to good quality, dunno about printing and colour correction - or contrast for that matter) colour images.

    Here is one example of the process (haven't pulled this one out in a while..)
    [​IMG]
    Little Cousin by athiril, on Flickr
     
  10. steveb533

    steveb533 Member

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  11. Photo Engineer

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    As I have noted before, the acidic hardening B&W fixers should never be used with color. Use non-hardening, neutral pH fixers for color. They should not be re-used for B&W.

    PE
     
  12. steveb533

    steveb533 Member

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    thanks. would tf-4 work for something like this? But at 25-35 degrees celsius I would assume. I believe it close to neutral.
     
  13. Photo Engineer

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    TF-4 is alkaline and thus should not be used in color processing. TF-5 is nearly neutral and can be used.

    PE
     
  14. steveb533

    steveb533 Member

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    Great, thanks! This has been very helpful.