How to get this effect?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by dxphoto, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. dxphoto

    dxphoto Member

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  2. blokeman

    blokeman Member

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    I'm guessing but my hunch is that it's either a slow slide film or a reverse process (ie: E6 developed as C41) ...... they are nice colours, reminds me of the old polaroid colours. It's difficult to tell a lot when all you can do is look on a computer screen. - david.
     
  3. mgphoto

    mgphoto Subscriber

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    It's one of Alex Webb's signature techniques. Slightly underexposing Kodachrome. This has the effect of exaggerating and saturating the colors and darkening shadow areas, thus further exaggerating the colors. I would imagine that the underexposure can also shift certain colors in the right situation.

    -Mark
     
  4. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    My guess is that it is slide film under exposed and shot under different light sources.

    The boat crossing one tells you it's dusk, hence the background is a cold blue like colour from the cold blue sky. The light lighting up the couple is more than likely tungsten, which the film sees as reddish.

    The young boy with the fairy floss is probably lit with fluorescent light, the film sees that as green light, the background part which is a funny warm colour could possibly be sodium vapour type lighting.

    Mick.
     
  5. Poco

    Poco Member

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    While my guess would be along the lines of those already posted, there are some obvious halos visible in the swinging boy shot so you know there's been some manipulation. Since we don't know how much, I'd say all bets are off.
     
  6. HerrBremerhaven

    HerrBremerhaven Member

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    Hello dxphoto,

    I would tend to agree with the underexposed transparency film, though it is tough to tell when viewing JPEGs on the internet. Since I have seen some published images from Alex Webb, I do think Magnum have done a good job represecting his images on their website, though you should click on the higer resolution link below each image to get a better view.

    One thing that can help is figuring out the time of day. If you see long shadows in the images, then it would need to be early or late in the day. A lack of shadows can mean closer to noon or midday. Shooting at midday can also create some higher contrast results with some transparency films. The comments other made about lights give other clues, since street lights can alter the results on film, even though you would not normally notice those with your eyes.

    Another clue is that the images are not super saturated, so it would be less likely he used something like Fuji Velvia or Kodak E100VS. While Kodachrome is one option, if you don't like the expense nor slower turnaround time (in some parts of the world), then try something like Fuji Astia 100F or Kodak E100G to start.

    Ciao!

    Gordon
     
  7. dxphoto

    dxphoto Member

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    Thanks guys. I did underexposure color negative for 1/3 to 2/3 stops before. It did give me kind unrealistic feeling. Have never tried this on slides as I have aways been told how accurated it should be on exposure with slides. Will try it next time.