How to put a 12exp and 24exp roll on one reel?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Wolfeye, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    I've been shooting a lot of 12 and 24 exposure rolls. Love 'em for testing new cameras and lenses. Sometimes I've tried to develop a 24 and a 12 on the same reel... but sometimes the film slips and rides over. No harm thus far but it could certainly cause problems. Is there a good way to develop a 12 and a 24 together on one reel? I usually have a another reel too, with a 36exp loaded, so both reels in my tank are in use.
     
  2. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    What type of reels are you using - stainless steel, Paterson plastic, JOBO or ...?
     
  3. cmo

    cmo Member

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    The last version of the Jobo reels has a red stop clip that allows to do something like that:

    You can move this clip in and out of the way the film glides into the reel. In the 'out of my way' position you put the first film in. Then you put the clip in the 'in' position and insert the next film. The clip avoids the films touch each other. It works great with two 120 films in these reels, I did not try it with two 35mm films though.

    With other reels this will be difficult unless you are very skillful and daring. The other method is to spool two films together in one reel, back to back. It's risky. I did it one with four films, and I lost some frames on two of them because there was not enough space in the reels to keep the films completely apart.
     
  4. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    You could tape them end to end. If you have a metal reel, you can also roll them back to back.
     
  5. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I will never understand why people will chance ruining a film by shortcutting. Two films, two batches. Chems are not that expensive to warrant doing two films jambed together on a single reel, risking developer exhaustion or undeveloped areas from them touching. This is supposed to be a relaxing hobby, why the rush? If there is a deadline for processing(client), get a second tank and reel, or a double tank(2x 120/4x135) with two reels for 120. The best quality assurance you can perform is to develope one roll at a time.
     
  6. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    I regualrly 'splice' on a three or so exposure clip of a film at the end of a 24 or 27 or 36 exposure 35mm film.

    That little piece is part of a film that I exposed of my wife holding a grey card and a color patch in the front yard, in diffuse light.

    It goes in with the first of every batch of c-41 that I mix. I use it as a quality control measure, to see what different colur response might be introduced by the different DIY c-41 formulae I play with.

    I use about a 1" x 1" patch of tape from a roll of 'blue max' film spilcing tape. It does just what it says it does; far superior ot masking tape used in the past.
     
  7. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    AMEN! Usually when people try to save time or money they do neither.
     
  8. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    With a top and tail on each film there might be a risk that it wouldn't all fit and there might be very little safety margin before the second film overrode the first.

    To be on the safeside why not develop and 12 and 24 separately then once dry try putting them onto a reel to see how easy or difficult it will be in the dark and how much safety margin there is. The red clip on the Jobo reel may work and if you have a Jobo reel you will then know where to place it once you have tried it with a developed 12 and 24.

    If things are tight and if you are bold then you might cut a predetermined length from the first film at both ends in the dark and the same again on the second film to cut down the length.

    I wouldn't have the courage in case it went wrong and I ruined some negs but these are some ideas if you want to try it.

    pentaxuser
     
  9. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    If you don't have a tall tank, it's easy enough to run two tanks at the same time, and at much less risk.
     
  10. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

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    I really appreciate the advice saying "don't do that you idiot" those are REALLY helpful. Boy, I did need a good sermon. Thanks!

    On the JOBO pieces, I'll have to look see if I can find or make something similar. The tape suggestion will be the first one I try. I never would have thought of that honestly. Thanks!
     
  11. Роберт

    Роберт Member

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    The Jobo reel with the Red clip is for 2x 120 roll film so for seperation of 2x 82cm. So you can not use it for a 12 exp. + 24 exp. 35mm film.

    You could tape them together but I would go the way of 2x development in the 1510 Jobo 250ml tank without any further risk.