How to remove the emulsion from a developed/fixed film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by narigas2006, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. narigas2006

    narigas2006 Member

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    Hi,

    i wanna get some clear acetate from fixed films, how should I remove fixed emulsions? many thanks.
     
  2. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    why not just develop andn fix some unexposed film and use that?
     
  3. jstraw

    jstraw Member

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    just fix it..no dev
     
  4. lonelyboy

    lonelyboy Member

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    use a knife to scape the emulsion off
     
  5. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Probably removing the emulsion will also remove the subbing layer and prevent further coatings from adhering to the film support. I would go with the fixing washing and drying.

    Scraping will scratch the film.

    PE
     
  6. jim appleyard

    jim appleyard Member

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    I'm not sure what your purpose is, but fixing will only remove the silver from the emulsion, not remove the emulsion from the base. Am I correct?

    If you actually wish to remove the emulsion in its entirety, try hot water, very hot water. Gelatin should dissolve in hot water.
     
  7. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    I got my darkroom solutions mixed up once and dunked developed negatives in straight Clorox for about 30-seconds rather than fixer. There was no trace of an image left.
    juan
     
  8. Rombo

    Rombo Member

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    You should use hot water at aprox. 80 degree Celsius. Put film inside and then gently rub all emulsion with nails or fingers. It should work.
     
  9. raucousimages

    raucousimages Member

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    Soak in a warm solution of sodium carbonate. This is the same process to do chemical reticulation. If you reticulate too long the emulsion just slides off without scrubbing and avoids scratching the film base. Plus-X, Tri-X and other older films work well. Newer T-grain emulsions are very hard to remove.
     
  10. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

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    Clorox is easiest and quickest.
     
  11. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    I stress again that if you wish to coat on the film afterwards, you will remove the subbing layer with these treatments and will have to re-sub the support somehow.

    PE
     
  12. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

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    While we are on the subject, does the subbing layer contain any dye? The only time I ever purposely removed the emulsion it was for the purpose of measuring the base density that some films use to prevent light piping in 35 mm film. I'd rather not talk about the accidental times.
     
  13. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    The subbing layer contains no dye. The support contains a conductive material.

    PE
     
  14. narigas2006

    narigas2006 Member

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    Thanks for all the replies, but what is clorox?

    Thank you all, I am presuming clorox is normal bleach (sodium hypochlorite). It does not remove the emulsion of film in a large scale (about 15m of film). The thing is that I wanna get rid of the exposed (and developed and fixed) emulsion from some film (16mm) I have. I was stupid enough to buy polyester clean leader base and thinking well now, if the film jam, my poor 16mm camera will be f... So I wanna get some clear acetate instead. I'll try the hot water + (what do you think about tiocianatye?). cheers
     
  15. CRhymer

    CRhymer Subscriber

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    Hello,

    If you want clear acetate leader, Chlorox (sodium hypochlorite) will certainly work. Just put your 15m un-spooled into a pail and let it sit a while. I have done this a number of times. Then just wipe the emulsion off with a soft cloth (most of it will just float away) and rinse well. Since polyester (estar) leader does not work with film cement, I use old acetate film lengths (stripped) for leaders with acetate based film. Clean acetate leader can also be dissolved to make film cement. This used to be an issue for me, due to my remote location, but Kodak film cement is still available - but not easy to find.

    Why are you using leader in your camera? Daylight load spools have extra film to allow for a little waste at each end. 16mm cartridges, which are still available (though sometimes out of date) and re-loadable (with some care) have almost no waste.

    Have I understood your question correctly? Why do you think polyester film will jam your camera? Are you trying to re-coat acetate with new emulsion? Oh, one more thing, that is a 16mm cine camera, isn't it?

    Cheers,
    Clarence
     
  16. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    Yes, Clorox is normal chlorine bleach.
    juan
     
  17. narigas2006

    narigas2006 Member

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    Thanks Clarence, I want to recoat the fbase with home-made emulsion and I have clean polyester base (and while it does not happen to often, it still can happen (jamming) and i was afraid of breaking the claw . Yes, that's 16mm cine camera. Many thanks.

     
  18. CRhymer

    CRhymer Subscriber

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    Hi,

    In that case (re-coating) I have no idea what effect chlorine bleach may have to the acetate base. I suspect PE is right and you will have to re-sub. I don't know how long you would have to wash to get rid of the residual bleach. At any rate, what kind of camera to you have? and how do you propose to do the coating? if you don't mind me asking.

    Cheers,
    Clarence