How to store leica

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by randy6, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. randy6

    randy6 Member

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    How to store leica, Should the shutter be cocked, should it be on a low or high shutter speed?
     
  2. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    It should be stored at my house.
     
  3. Sportera

    Sportera Member

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    I store mine loaded with Trix and hung around my neck!

    I don't think it matters. Just use it, and it will outlast those fondler Leicas that never get their shutters tripped
     
  4. erikhaugsby

    erikhaugsby Member

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    I would personally leave the shutter uncocked (fired), shutter speed doesn't matter. I have heard people say that the curtians are tensioned equally regardless of being un/cocked, and if that's the case it doesn't much matter how you store it as long as it isn't in a humid or extreme temperature environment.
     
  5. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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    Store it where you're reminded to pick it up and give it regular exercise at all shutter speeds.

    Lee
     
  6. bjorke

    bjorke Member

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    Shutter cocked

    in your hand

    otherwise sell it to someone who will store it properly :smile:
     
  7. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    It doesn't really matter, according to most sources I'm familiar with.
     
  8. copake_ham

    copake_ham Inactive

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    I always leave all my cameras in the uncocked position. That's simply because I don't want to wind up with a "waste shot" because I trip the shutter while picking up the camera.

    How could the speed setting matter at all?
     
  9. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    It probably doesn't with a Leica, but on some leaf shutters the high speeds are produced with an extra heavy spring (you can usually feel the extra spring tensioning when you set the shutter on the top one or two speeds, if this is the case), and it probably isn't a great idea to store such a shutter on the highest speed.
     
  10. livemoa

    livemoa Member

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    On a M6 setting it on B turns the meter off. Means that if it's in a bag or something and the shutter gets part depressed it wont drain the battery.
     
  11. raucousimages

    raucousimages Member

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    If you need to put it in storage for a long time I would store it fired, unloaded, in a good case with Silica-Gel to protect from water. If at all possoble fire it at least a couple times a month to keep it lubed. I store my MP fired, in a small padded case, in the kitchen, loaded with Tri-X, ready to go any time. I want to see how much use I can give it before I die. If I shoot two rolls a month until my mid 80's that is about 30,000 exposures. That is nowhere close to wearing out o Leica.
     
  12. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    Why would you want to store it?
     
  13. Donald Boyd

    Donald Boyd Member

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    Uncocked, battery removed, wrapped in silk and that wrapped in a ziplock baggy. Finally, put it in a box and seal it with packaging tape. :D
     
  14. sepiareverb

    sepiareverb Subscriber

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    Then with an address label that reads:

    sepiareverb
     
  15. elekm

    elekm Member

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    Definitely add some silica gel. When I moved my cameras from overseas, I told the moving company that I wanted to pack them myself. The moving company gave me hundreds of silica gel packs.

    I put one silica gel pack in the back, another in the shutter box with the lens removed. Then two more inside a ZIP-lock bag. That went into another ZIP-lock bag and then taped shut with packing tape.

    They then went onto a container ship, and I saw them about eight weeks later. But I didn't unpack them right away because I took a job in another city. Some didn't get unpacked until last year (three years after I packed them). I'm glad I was careful about getting them ready for a lengthy -- although unexpected -- storage.
     
  16. David H. Bebbington

    David H. Bebbington Inactive

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    Short answer - Tupperware-type container with a silica gel sachet (maybe two). MUCH easier to take the camera out when needed and then re-seal it. But - I just bought a Leica R3 which had spent quite a few years in a humidity-controlled cabinet, it was in great shape but the plastic support pad on the neckstrap was totally embrittled, which I think shows that finding ideal storage conditions for EVERY kind of material in a camera is not easy - low humidity can also cause grease to dry out.

    Regards,

    David