How to use close up filters.

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Mike Kennedy, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    I just picked up a nice set of Kenko's (+1,+2,+4) in a local swap meet.Is there a certain technique I should be following to get the most out of these filters?

    Thank You
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Just screw one (or more) on and focus as normal, they just let you move in closer than normal. No need for exposure compensation. You will need to move toward or away from your subject to find the focus range.
     
  3. bobwysiwyg

    bobwysiwyg Subscriber

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  4. jeffm2009

    jeffm2009 Member

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    This is cool, I actually hadn't heard of close up filters before. It looks like a good alternative to getting a new telephoto lens. I've been dabbling in food photography lately, so I'm glad to have found out about these.
     
  5. BobD

    BobD Member

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    You'll probably get better results at similar cost by using an extension tube
    or reverse adapter (assuming your camera uses interchangeable lenses).

    Most screw-on closeup lenses are single-element type optics and have poor
    correction often producing color separation and other aberrations.

    The 2-element type screw-on closeup lenses such as those made by Nikon and
    Canon are quite good but rather expensive usually.
     
  6. Lee L

    Lee L Member

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    Clarification of terms:
    Read 'chromatic abberation', i.e. not focusing various colors at the same plane, creating a 'color fringing' effect.
    This is not 'color separation', which is a method of creating separate B&W negatives for red, green, and blue portions of the spectrum.

    Lee
     
  7. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I did not even know that something as close up filters exist...
     
  8. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    My neither.

    Fascinating, though, how people can devise something that filters out distance. You just can't help but sit back in awe, and wonder what's next.
    :wink:
     
  9. thisismyname09

    thisismyname09 Member

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    I've found that you can remove the front element of some cheap tele-zoom lenses (which is usually an achromatic doublet) and fit it in the casing of a cheap UV filter (after you remove the UV glass), creating a really cheap and rather well corrected doublet closeup lens. I've not done extensive testing as to how well this actually works, since I don't really do macrophotography, but I can't see any chromatic aberration on the one test shot I did with it.
     
  10. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    Be very careful letting direct light hit the elements, most closeup lenses will flare badly. a lens shade is a good idea if it doesn't interfere with getting close enough.
     
  11. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    These are basically + diopter corrective lenses similar to putting on a cheap pair of reading glasses. Each one adds two morer reflective surfaces to the line-up with an air space to add muck to the mix. Given the right circumstances, they will work successfully. I'll stick to extension tubes and bellows.
     
  12. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    You should install them in ascending order 1,2,3 because the higher the # the greater the curve & possibility to scratch one of the surfaces.
     
  13. Galah

    Galah Member

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    Check out this link:


    http://www.shutterfreaks.com/Tips/tomhicksmacros.html
     
  14. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Member

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    Thanks All!

    Most informative answers.