How was 8x10 SS Kodak tank used?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by Murray@uptowngallery, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

    Messages:
    1,041
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Location:
    Holland, MI
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
    I bought on eBay years ago, for 'someday', a deep stainless steel tank, Kodak 8x10 IIRC.

    I then read they are chemistry hogs & got more interested in trays & a Unicolor drum.

    What kind of support mechanism was used with such tanks? Kind of tall & thin & easy to knock over...probably a trigger-happy bid on my part I guess. :rolleyes:
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    17,940
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Depends on how wide it is. Most that I've seen are freestanding, but I've seen some that are designed to sit in a water jacket.
     
  3. richard ide

    richard ide Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Location:
    Wellington C
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Mine are 1 gallon tanks (about 2.5" thick in the other dimension). Very economical with chemistry if you replenish the developer. I can develop 24 4 x 5 negatives at a time or 6 8 x 10. Would not be without them.
     
  4. CBG

    CBG Member

    Messages:
    894
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Another vote for the 1 gallon 6x10 tanks.

    C
     
  5. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

    Messages:
    9,434
    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    They're considerably harder to knock over when fully loaded with chemistry. 1 gallon weighs what, 8 lbs? And if you think a 1 gallon tank is tough, try one of the Kodak hard rubber 8x10 tanks - they hold 3.5 gallons. The stainless one was most likely intended to be used in a "production line" in a water jacket, with replenishment.
     
  6. Removed Account

    Removed Account Member

    Messages:
    907
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Nanaimo, Bri
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I received a bunch of the 3.5 gallon tanks from a fellow APUGger. Considering 4x5 is the largest I currently shoot they're only worth bringing out when I've got a LOT of film to process!
     
  7. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,768
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Both the 1 gallon and 3.5 gallon tanks were designed to fit into a water jacket or SS sink. In fact, there were special sinks designed for these tanks.

    The 1 gallon tanks used SS 8x10 holders, but the 3.5 gallon tanks held either holders or saran baskets that held up to 24 sheets of film or paper. If you used holders, there was a top insert for either tank that spaced the holders apart to avoid scratching.

    Kodak and other companies made nitrogen spargers for both types of tank for agitation with nitrogen burst.

    PE
     
  8. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

    Messages:
    1,041
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Location:
    Holland, MI
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
    Thank you. I was imagining a water jacket around it.

    Lifting a 3.5 gallon one to empty it (oh, duh, that's why you need a sink) would not be fun for people with no running water/drainage in their DR.
     
  9. jp80874

    jp80874 Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,494
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Location:
    Bath, OH 442
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    I use the one gallon ss tanks as a distilled water dip before hanging sheets to dry. This is after developing five sheets of 8x10 in a Jobo Expert tank.

    John Powers
     
  10. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Nicholasvill
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I used the 3.5 gallon SS tanks for developing 18 rolls of 120 using a rack to lift them all out at once. I had several tanks lined up in the sink with a water jacket using a pipe in the drain so it would overflow a couple inches. I also had a rack to hold several sheets of LF film that was loaded in to the hangers. The system worked well, but you do need to use a replenishment type developer to make it economical. This was done for a studio, so we used a lot of film, often 36 rolls a week or more. Not a high count by studio standards, but it was high end, so volume is all relative.
     
  11. Murray@uptowngallery

    Murray@uptowngallery Member

    Messages:
    1,041
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Location:
    Holland, MI
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
    I looked in the box to see how big it was, and to my surprise, it had 4 8x10 hangers in it, so maybe it's not quite the useless orphan I initially thought ("I was thinking what good is 1 tank?")
     
  12. Michael Kadillak

    Michael Kadillak Member

    Messages:
    623
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2003
    Gaseous burst agitation, the former industry standard for film development for nearly 40 years. When you take your transparency sheet film for E6 to a lab there is a 90% chance that they are using gaseous burst to develop it. With JOBO on the ropes there is no more repeatable and precise way to develop film around. There is only one moving part (the gas solenoid valve). I personally like the tanks with the wider rim.

    Reference - View Camera magazine May June 2007.

    Cheers!