hung out to dry

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by bob2, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. bob2

    bob2 Member

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    My first two rolls are drying as i type this.(delta 100)I know that the film negatives must be dry before I scan but how can I be sure they are?
     
  2. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    If the film doesn't feel wet or sticky, it's dry. During heating season, 2 or 3 hours is probably enough.
     
  3. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member

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    How can you be sure anything is dry? It's dry when it looks dry. You can wait overnight, if you're worried about it.
     
  4. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Member

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    Congratulations, welcome to the film club. :smile:
     
  5. Thanasis

    Thanasis Member

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    Well done! It was Delta 100 to which I lost my virginity also.
     
  6. Alex Bishop-Thorpe

    Alex Bishop-Thorpe Member

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    T-max 100 for me, only two shots came out and I didn't know how long I was meant to agitate, so I sort of just flailed constantly.
    Welcome aboard - film is dry when you can look along it's length and not see any marks that look like water waiting to evaporate. After a few more rolls you'll get to know the look of it easily.
     
  7. Kevin Caulfield

    Kevin Caulfield Subscriber

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    You will also see the hung rolls twist away from the vertical for a while as they dry. When they return to the vertical they are nearly dry.
     
  8. Thanasis

    Thanasis Member

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    I usually leave them be for about six hours before i begin to handle them. If its late and i dont feel like cutting and sleeving them, i let them hang overnight. But i live in a place which gets quite humid especially in summer.
     
  9. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    If you gently sandwich the film between your index and second fingers and run them down the film they are sensitive enough to pick up any stickiness which tells you the film is still wet. Once your fingers run smoothly down the whole length of film it's dry. You don't say what you use to dry but if the film's enclosed in a tube with a fan blowing ambient air over it such as with a UT100 dryer then I find that film dries in about 20 mins, The UT100 has two heat settings but I'd recommend avoiding using either setting to stop curling and just use ambient blown air.

    Can't say how long it would take with no blown air but the two finger test still holds good.

    pentaxuser
     
  10. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    My eight blade film squeegee makes
    for 20 minute drying. I PhotoFlo, hang
    at top, then very slowly draw the wetted
    squeegee downward. Weight at bottom.
    Eight blade film squeegees are available
    under a few brand names.
    Mine is a JOBO. Dan
     
  11. Christopher Walrath

    Christopher Walrath Member

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    Bob, mine, with circulating air, is cut and store dry in just over an hour without the aid of any chemistry for drying. But longer dry times are better.

    For me it was TMY (TMax400) 120 roll film (hell of a loader). First one Thurs eve, 8 negs out of 12. Second roll last night and I nailed it. Perfect. But . . .

    Along this vein with two rolls complete. There are tiny fibrous particles on the negatives. I know they are airborne and I need to rinse them again to get them off. I have ordered some PhotoFlo. Will that help the negs be dust resistant? If not, how can I dust proof my down stairs half bath?