Hypo clearing agent uneeded for film?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Iluvmycam, Jul 5, 2013.

  1. Iluvmycam

    Iluvmycam Member

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    Was told film does not need hypo clear since it does not absorb much.

    What do you think about this?
     
  2. ann

    ann Subscriber

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    Modern films don't need hypo clearing as the bases are much thinner and easier to wash.

    In the old days , the emulsion was much thicker and took longer to wash , and hence HCA.

    There is one of the European films that would benefit and I am sure someone will chime and and mention which one, as the name as slipped my mind.
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    I use rapid fix for all my films and FB paper, only use HCA for paper.
     
  4. mono

    mono Subscriber

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    If you use alkali fixer, there is no need for HCA at all!
     
  5. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    There will be people who say it is unnecessary for anything and those who call it indispensable. I use it only for fiber-based paper.
     
  6. presspass

    presspass Member

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    I've used it for more than two decades. It may not be necessary, but I follow the wash routine recommended by Permawash and my negs from the 1970s and 80s are just fine. We use well water, so we don't like to waste it on longer washes than necessary. I can't say if its needed or not, but it works for me and I'll stick with it.
     
  7. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    If I recall correctly Ralph Lambrecht in his book still lists HCA as a stage in film processing so presumably he believes that it serves a purpose.

    pentaxuser
     
  8. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Ilford recommends that if a non-hardening fixer is used, a 5-10-20 inversion method of washing will leave the film clean. After fixing, fill the tank with clear water the same temp as the process, and invert the tank 5 times. Drain and refill, inverting 10 times, then draining. Finally, fill the tank once again, inverting 20 times, then draining. At this point the film is ready to either be soaked in photo flo(or whatever brand) of rinse aid then hung to dry. For those who prefer to conserve water, this is a wonderful method, I recommend it.
     
  9. pbromaghin

    pbromaghin Subscriber

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    I use HCA and then do the Ilford wash method. This is not because I know anything, but rather because I don't want to find out the hard way a few years from now that it was necessary.
     
  10. Dr Croubie

    Dr Croubie Member

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    I'd never used it for my Tmax400 in Xtol, nor my Rollei Retro 100 & APX100 in Rodinal (those are the main 3 that I've dev'd at home lately), although I'd read on the Tmax datasheet something about needing HypoClear or it goes pink. It never went pink.

    Then I did a roll of Tmax400 and my first roll of TriX 400 together in the same tank in xtol. Fixed in Ilford RapidFixer as I always do, washed using the Ilford 5-10-20 washing method, hung them out to dry, and the Tri-X was pink. Very pink.
    So the next day I went and got some Kodak HypoClear, didn't want to mix the whole 5L so I just put one spoon in one litre, re-spooled the TriX and washed it again, it turned out fine.

    It's one of those things that, if you don't do it, there's a chance something may go wrong, but there's no downsides to doing it besides spending a bit of cash. So I'm probably just going to do it from now on (at least for my TriX).
     
  11. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I use it.

    It makes it extremely unlikely that my washing will be insufficient.

    Greg Davis' thread on his Film Washing Test makes it obvious that it helps ensure complete washing: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/84180-film-washing-test.html

    If you are willing to frequently check for retained fixer, then you can rely on your tests instead. Periodic checks are still a good idea though.