I done gone and did now...dang it!

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by gnashings, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. gnashings

    gnashings Inactive

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    This is my first post (I think) in this section of APUG. I shoot 95% B&W, with some grocery store colour film for those "under the Christmas tree" type photos.
    I shot a roll of Velvia 50.
    I picked it up, and my wife and I looked at the results outside the store, in the mall.
    I went back in.
    I now have their last 30 rolls... (and one roll of the 100F, just to compare).

    I hope it keeps ok :smile:

    Peter.
     
  2. Donald Qualls

    Donald Qualls Member

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    Store it in zipper freezer bags, in the freezer, and take it out a few hours before you want to use it, and it'll be good several years past the expiration on the box.

    I've been avoiding trying slides again. I shot a few rolls of them long ago (so long ago, some were in 28x28 mm 126 format, and I last owned a camera for that film in 1982). These days, one roll with processing would break my film budget for a month or more. If I go there, next thing you know I'll be panhandling on freeway ramps with a sign "will work for film"... :surprised:
     
  3. reellis67

    reellis67 Subscriber

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    I keep mine as Donald stated and it seems fine. I've got some 120 slide film that is 6 months or more out and it still looks good when developed. I shoot color from time to time, but I have to drive it into town (about 1:30 drive each way) so I find that I don't shoot a lot. There really is nothing, and I mean nothing, like viewing transparencies though. I do a lot of stereo work and a sterograph can't hold a candle to viewing stereo slides. They just look so vibrant!

    - Randy
     
  4. Derek Lofgreen

    Derek Lofgreen Subscriber

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    I know what you mean Peter. I started using Kodaks E100GX and I just fell in love with the stuff. I don't know about Velvia 50, I figure sence it's not being made anymore I won't even try it. It's easier to quit an adiction if you never start in the first place.

    D.
     
  5. Sandra Billingham

    Sandra Billingham Inactive

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    Hi, well this is my first post on Apug! I shoot a lot of velvia and absolutely love the stuff. I store mine in the freezer to in freezer bags.

    Sandra
     
  6. gnashings

    gnashings Inactive

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    Sandra, welcome to APUG!

    Everyone, thanks for the advice - I feel better knowing that I won't have to speed-shoot the stuff! At my pace, 30 rolls should last me a while! Given what passes for "colour processing" nowdays, and that I do not have the facilities to do my own (yet), I am starting to feel that if need colour, I will turn to slides.
    While I am here, let me ask - what would be a good transparency film portraiture? I am not even looking for "realistic" rendition, frankly, if I could get that golden glowing vintage look, I would be very happy!

    Thanks again for the advice and listening to my rants and raves!:smile:

    Peter.
     
  7. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    I've got a roll with your name on it if you want it, either 35mm or 120. Rember, the Velvia pushers always give you your first roll for free. :D
     
  8. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    I have heard that provia is worth a try for saturated portraiture. I guess Velvia is garish and somewhat frighteining.

    I think that some of the Kodak stuff is really made for that purpose. Check out Ektachrome Plus (EPP). It is supposed to be just the thing. If you want a really saturated look, it might not be enough, I am not really sure about that.
     
  9. gnashings

    gnashings Inactive

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    Thanks for the suggestions, I think this B&W die-hard may be...uhm...branching out... my poor wallet...:smile:
     
  10. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

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    Hi, Peter, Velvia 50 is a wonderful tranny film for most purposes if you want highly contrast saturated pure, " in your face", colours, great for many type of work, but for portraits ( the majority of my work ) I prefer Fuji Astia F, because portraiture is what it was devised for , it produces pleasing and natural looking skin tones, and a gentle colour palate, combined with a lower level of contrast, try a roll , and compare them I think you'll see what I mean.
     
  11. srs5694

    srs5694 Member

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    Do you do your own B&W processing? If so, you've got everything you need to do color except the chemistry, and maybe a dishpan or something to hold a water bath. Color (particularly C-41) isn't really harder than B&W; it's just done at a higher temperature (100F) and is a bit more finicky about consistency. Of course, if you want to, you can invest in equipment to add varying degrees of automation to your color processing.

    E-6 is a bit more complex than C-41 because it has more steps, but it's still do-able in a simple darkroom. RA-4 (color print from negative) processing is similar in complexity to B&W print processing. It's conventionally done in drums or print processing machines, but can be done in trays. The trouble with color print processing is in getting the color balance right. As somebody who's still fairly new at it, I find it frustrating as often as not, but I'm improving.