I have developed my first roll: thanks APUGers!

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by sterioma, Oct 23, 2004.

  1. sterioma

    sterioma Member

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    I have made it!

    Last night I have finally developed my first BW film :smile:

    I want to then the APUGers who've helped me with the selection of the equipment for my darkroom!!!


    The film/develper combo is Kodak Tri-X (rated at 400) and Rodinal (1+50). Everything has gone smooth; even loading the reels wasn't so difficult after practicing a little with an old roll. The only thing I messed up has been the stop-bath, which I disposed into the sink instead of putting it back into the bottle after using. Not such a big deal anyway....

    The results are better than I had hoped for being this my first roll. The only problem I noticed is that a couple of frames (number 34 and 35) have a some kind of darker "small ripples" on one side around the "holes" of the film, like the emulsion has been dragged outside the borders (if you know what I mean...). Guess it's a problem with agitation: I followed the instructions of the Paterson thank suggesting to use that stick to twist the reels vigorously in the first seconds of development.

    The negatives look a bit grainy (I know this is a characteristic of Rodinal). I have chosen the 1+50 dilution (14 minutes) as suggested by the Rodinal instructions, thinking that maybe it would have been easier than 1+25 for 7 minutes. Is it correct to say that with 1+25 I should have got a bit less grain? Also, would it be correct ot say that if I happened to use a lower E.I. (say, 200 ISO), again the grain might be lower?

    I am attaching two sample scans (depicting myself), with no level corrections. Grain has been smoothed by resizing algorithm. I haven't got an enlager, so I cannot post a print scan (one thing at a time :smile:)


    Details:
    Film: Kodak Tri-X 400 35mm (E.I. 400)
    Developer: Rodinal 1+50 (20C) / 14 min. Ag. 30 seconds initial (twist), then 2 inversions every 30sec.
    Stop bath: BW-Stop (20C) / 1 min
    Fixer:Agefix (1+5) (20C) / 5 min
    Wetting agent: Agepon (1+200) / 1 min
    Camera: Nikon FG-20
    Lens: Nikkor 105/2.5 AIS
     

    Attached Files:

  2. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Congratulations - Very good results especially for your first roll, mine was errrm crap due to getting finger tied loading the spiral and touching the emulsion.

    Tipped the stop-bath away? Never mind I never use it, instead I just use running water for 2 to 3 minutes. Rodinal 1+25 would have reduced the grain slightly but would have also increased the contrast. As your doing your own now try reducing the film speed, I like HP5+ at 200 in Rodinal for example.

    My first thoughts on the small ripples and dragged emulsion sounds more like physical damage, did you pull on the roll as you cut the spool off or get a slight jam on the spirals towards the end of loading?

    Welcome to the wonderful world of developing and the magical world of Rodinal :wink:
     
  3. modafoto

    modafoto Subscriber

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    Welcome from me, too! I have done a roll of Tri-X in Rodinal yesterday. But I am still trying to get the time right. I did it for 15 minutes with inversion 1 minute in the beginning and 5 inversions every minute. Then my own ModaStop (see recipes) and Agfa Acidofix.

    Viva la Rodinal!
     
  4. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Welcome to the obsession! Looks good for the first time out.

    As for those ripples around the sprocket holes, there are a few possibilities

    --Physical damage to the film causing an agitation problem as described in one of the previous posts (sounds like a good guess to me).

    --A general agitation issue ("bromide drag"), which I've experienced myself with the Paterson reels, but usually it would affect more than two frames. If it's a persistent problem with your choice of developer, film, and agitation method, then try stainless steel reels, and it should go away. It worked for me.

    --Fogging through the light trap of the film cartridge. Normally this should be visible not only around the sprockets, but in the frame as well, but since you say you see the problem only at the end of the roll, it's worth considering. If you're changing film outdoors and don't have any shade nearby, then orient yourself so that your body prevents the direct light of the sun from falling on the camera as you load and unload.
     
  5. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Afternoon, Sterioma,

    Congratulations on your results. I assume you realize that you have just contracted a chronic and incurable disease.

    Konical
     
  6. Andy K

    Andy K Member

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    Congratulations and welcome to the dark side! :smile: I too developed my first roll last week, also using Rodinal. I used Ilford FP4 125ASA in a 1+25 solution. There are a couple of my frames from that roll in the standard gallery if you wish to see the contrast I got. Needless to say I'm dead chuffed at the results, I've looked like this --> :D for days now!
     
  7. Jim Moore

    Jim Moore Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. BWGirl

    BWGirl Member

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    Well, it's kind of hard to top that little bouncing guy, but Congrats to both of you!!!

    Experiment with agitation and with different dilutions. Be sure to keep good records of what you do so when you find the perfect combinations you can repeat them!!! Nothing worse than the best negs on the planet and not remembering how to do it again!!!

    Welcome to the B&W and negative developing club!!! Heck, I STILL get that :D when I develop a roll!!! :wink:
     
  9. Lee Shively

    Lee Shively Member

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    Absolutely WONDERFUL!!!

    I just had a flash of deja vu on my first roll about 1973. I think it was Tri-X in Microdol-X processed in some off-brand plastic tank with a clear plastic reel and a little twisty-thingy to agitate the film that also doubled as a thermometer. I damn near burst with pride when there was actually an image on the film.

    You know this is magic, don't you? Welcome to the Brotherhood.
     
  10. Melanie

    Melanie Member

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    Hi
    great results, you should be proud, my first roll did not come out very will at all :sad: but after writing down every thing that i do during developing the rolls that followed has me walking around with :D for a few days intel i fell the urge to develop again.
    I'm enjoy the darkside very much.
    Melanie
     
  11. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    The "swirl" marks around sprocket holes are *usually* caused by "cavitation" of the developer, due to too - vigorous agitation.

    Unless they extend into the image area, I wouldn't worry too much about them. If they do, I'd slow the agitation down, especially the "twirling".
     
  12. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    If those small ripples are dark and kinda crescent shaped they are likely pinch marks where the edge of the film was crimped during handling. Such pressure marks will act the same as if light hit the film in those points and develop black.
     
  13. sterioma

    sterioma Member

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    Everybody, thanks for the feedback and encouragment. I am really proud of the results myself, it was really fascinating (almost magical) seeing the negatives coming out from the reels with some image on them!

    As far as the marks around the holes are concerned, now that you mention it something did happen at the end of the loading, possibly a small jam. Hopefully with some more practice I will become more proficient in loading.

    Can't wait to process the next one!!! :smile:
    (it's going to be the same but for Rodinal diluted as 1+25 (7min). Want to see how the grain will change)
     
  14. g0tr00t

    g0tr00t Member

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    Whoo hoo! A magician is born. :smile: I developed my first roll a few weeks back in class. I am addicted now. In school they use water instead of stop bath. I only use stop for my prints. Tried it both ways in the developer and printing. I like the water stop better. Just my opinion...

    Congrats!!!

    [​IMG]
     
  15. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Excellent! congratulations.

    As per Rodinal dilution, look for a thread on the BW film, paper chemistry about it.

    The dark marks can either be crimping while loading the reel (since it is the last frames only) or too much agitation. I've found that Rodinal gives a longer tonal scale when agitated only once per minute (after the initial 30 or 45 seconds)
     
  16. ghinson

    ghinson Member

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    What follows might be a loaded question. Sorry.

    I developed my first roll last week in class. I want to start doing this at home. I live in an area with only 1 camera shop and it takes my 2 weeks to get back BW 120 roll film. That is unacceptable. Down the road, I will have a darkroom. For now, I have a dark closet. Good enough for loading.

    I'd like suggestions as to what chemicals to purchase for my home exploits. I will be shooting 35mm and 120, using Tmax 400, Ilford Delta 100, and Tmax 100. I would love to hear suggestions even as to specific brands of stop bath, fixer, etc., as well as developer.

    Thanks!

    Greg
     
  17. Blighty

    Blighty Subscriber

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    Dear Sterioma,
    Great to welcome another devotee of the black art. Like Lee Shively, I too had a flashback to my first processed film (FP4 in Promicrol, I think) some 30 odd years since. I've had my share of disasters too! Just a shame this forum wasn't around in 1973. Speaking for myself, I,ve always found that inversion agitation works better than the twiddle stick, but that's the beauty of this craft; ask a million different photographers and you'll get a million different answers. Enjoy yourself, regards, BLIGHTY
     
  18. rogueish

    rogueish Member

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    So far I have been using Ilford brands of chems and films, and have no complaints. Currently using Ilford HC (which is a concentrate) diluted 1+31, Ilfostop and Ilford RapidFix. At the time (about 18 months ago) a 4 litre jug of fix was all I could get, so I've been using it forever. My next developer will be Rodinal. (the brainwashing transmissions from the Rodinal Militia are getting to me). I also like the Delta series of film, have you tried FP4 and HP5? I am currently using Kodak TX400 for night class assignments.
    Yes it does take forever to get B&W or 120 film back from the labs. But B&W 120 film! I'm surprised you get it back in the same month! :surprised:
     
  19. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Morning, Greg,

    I'd go for a liquid concentrate such as HC-110 or T-Max. Do the dilution immediately before each batch instead of mixing the concentrate into a stock solution as suggested by Kodak. The amounts of concentrate will usually be no more than a couple of ounces (probably less with HC-110) unless you process many rolls in each batch, so get a small graduate which can easily measure fractional-ounce amounts.
    There's nothing wrong with powder developers such as D-76, but they have to be mixed and stored. Forget stop bath; just use water.

    Use a Rapid Fix (I like Kodak's for film, Ilford's for printing.) just because it's quicker. Don't forget Hypo-clear such as Perma-wash to save both time and water. Finally, use Photo-Flo. Use a much, much, much more dilute solution than suggested on the bottle. (A couple of drops in enough water to cover a 35mm reel should be enough.) One small bottle should last you for years.

    Konical
     
  20. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Hiya Greg.
    I'd reccomend that you use a longer life developer such as Kodak HC110 or Ilford DDx or AGFA Rodinal (each of them is different)
    Which developer did you use in class?

    As per stop and fixer, doesn't make much difference. I'm partial to liquid fixer concentrates and I'm using the Record brand (generic) lately with good results.




     
  21. ghinson

    ghinson Member

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    We used powdered D76 in class. The teacher mentioned that he is only able to get the powdered developers right now. I live on an island and apparently the homeland security measures now make it impossible to ship the liquids except via ground transport. And, there is no ground between us and the next city. I have not had a chance to research this yet, and am not sure if the typical mail order house will notice, because I do give a normal-looking Massachusetts zip. So, it might have to be D76.
     
  22. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    powdered is not bad, just that liquid is more convenient
    If you want, stick to D76/ID11 while you learn, also you can get citri acid (powder) to use as a stop bath, fixer try a rapid fixer.
    Can you get the stuff inladn somewhere and then transport it by boat to nantucket?
    that way you can bypass the land transport only (I guess)