I miss Color EIR film

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by jbwpro, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. jbwpro

    jbwpro Member

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    I have searched for a topic like this and couldn't find anything like it, I apologize if there is something already.

    I truly miss color infrared film - I have one more 11 year old expired roll in the freezer and it is grain city. It makes complete sense from an economic standpoint why it was discontinued, but is there any snowball's chance it could ever come back in any form at all? Efke, Rollei and Illford all have come out with BW infrared solutions (some true, some not, but still fantastic and better than nothing). Why would kodak not license the emulsion technology to someone else to create in small batches, is that even possible? Why hasn't anyone else tried to develop anything like it?
    I realize there is a lot of fiscal naivety involved in my questions here, but is there any chance?
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    There is nothing to licence, it's old technology.
     
  3. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    In the long thread about HIE PE discussed the problems with making HIE. The problems are similar with EIR.

    Steve
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    What about making up your own colour separation images including a separation for IR by shooting a panchromatic/IR film with different filters? E.g. you could use r,g,b, and IR filters, shoot three or four separate frames, and then combine them as you wish to produce a colour neg or positive. It could be done in a purely analogue way. Since the IR films on the market are really edge-visible, I think I'd be tempted to shoot with g and b filters and use an IR filter for red + IR.
     
  5. amuderick

    amuderick Member

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    Color EIR is still available...sort of...

    Contact Dean Bennici

    www.bennici.net

    He buys Aerochrome rolls and cuts them down to 120 size.
     
  6. E76

    E76 Member

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    The bad news is that the Aerochrome film he cuts down is also discontinued... :sad:
     
  7. Toffle

    Toffle Member

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    I had the pleasure of shooting one roll of EIR a few years ago. In retrospect, I should have respooled it to three rolls so I could learn a little as I went. I discovered the film is not so great with inorganics, (concrete, steel, etc.) but wonderful with foliage, fabric and flesh. (the three "F"s?) I really should Pick up some of Dean's 120. This film is too good to be gone yet.
     
  8. amuderick

    amuderick Member

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    Dean just got one of the last rolls and product is currently available from him.
     
  9. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

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    I wish the Aerochrome wasn't discontinued!!
     
  10. happyjam64

    happyjam64 Member

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    Uh, just thinking out loud here, couldn't we replicate EIR with black and white films plus colour separation filters? For example, take a photo with infrared film, then b/w film with a red filter, then another b/w photo with a green filter. Then use the infrared photo as the red channel, the red photo as the green channel, and the green photo as the blue channel?

    I was reading the wiki page on infrared photos and it said this about EIR:
    Any thoughts?

    Edit: Someone beat me to it, I just read keithwms post. In theory, I think our ideas should work, but I don't know about in practice.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 4, 2010
  11. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    This is brilliant!

    Not to mention, this would allow one to make unique, customized, and funkier EIR-esque color combinations. I mean, the choice to make the IR appear red in EIR is arbitrary, as far as I know. I've always wondered what different color combinations would yield.
     
  12. happyjam64

    happyjam64 Member

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    Yeah, I think it would be something to explore. Hopefully I'll get some wratten filters soon, (perhaps 25, 58, 47, anyone have suggestions?) and do some colour separation work I've always wanted to do!
     
  13. Nikanon

    Nikanon Member

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    Color infrared is impossible with black and white film, there are no dye couplers in the emulsion to record individual colors, simply the silver halides (plus sensitizers) reacting with photons. Recording black and white film with different color filters will only give you different tonal relationships, but not record any color information.
     
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  15. mopar_guy

    mopar_guy Subscriber

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    I never used any EIR. It was just too darned expensive.:blink:
     
  16. happyjam64

    happyjam64 Member

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    Yes, but that in itself is colour information!

    Indeed there are no colour couplers in b/w film, but we can take those tonal relationships and use them as the elementary makeup of a colour photograph. For example, if I took a b/w picture with a red filter, the film (assuming it's pan film) would therefore only capture the intensities of the colour red in the given scene (that's why the sky comes out black, because the sky is almost cyan - the opposite of red). Therefore, this "red b/w" image can be used as the red channel in a typical RGB image.

    Take a look at the dye transfer process. Having 3 different b/w pictures of the same scene separated by filters, they would be compiled to make a colour image. Technicolor was also based on this principle.

    Thats why I think it might just be possible to replicate EIR with 3 separation negatives. I was also just looking at the general spectral sensitivity of infrared film and I noticed it still has sensitivity in the blue/green area. So, I think the infrared exposure would have to be behind a red filter to block the green/blue spectrum.

    Okay guys, let's get the dye-transfer process going again! (Or we could just use PS to compile the channels)

    Edit: Does anyone know the spectral sensitivity of the infrared layer in EIR? Or what that layer actually captured?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 5, 2010
  17. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    This image was done via the technique mentioned above. This portrait of me was made by APUG member Goldie.
     

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  18. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    The sky is, as we all know, blue. Not (almost) cyan.
    And blue is indeed at the other end of the spectrum, and not let through by a (good) red filter.
     
  19. EdSawyer

    EdSawyer Member

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    To make the separation idea work, you'd need to shoot B&W IR film, of course. But otherwise it should be doable. Of course unless combined digitally you are probably looking at pin-registered neg carriers and easels to get prints to line up. And it would only work for static subjects.

    -Ed
     
  20. Stephen Frizza

    Stephen Frizza Member

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    when certain things in the photo arnt static the results get really interesting!
     
  21. happyjam64

    happyjam64 Member

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    Woah, cool portrait. Well, now we know it works, thanks Stephen!

    Just another thought here, what if we bi-packed an ortho film with some infrared film and have a red filter in between (assuming the ortho film didn't have an anti-halation layer)? So light would hit the ortho film and capture the green and blue. Then the red filter would block the green and blue and let the infrared film capture the red and infrared.

    Perhaps we could even apply the resulting negatives to this theory http://www.greatreality.com/Color2Color.htm

    I wonder what would happen...
     
  22. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    As mentioned: not only will it work, it'll work well. A lot of colour work was done with b&w film. The idea of colour sep goes waaay back. In my own research on the topic, I quickly ran into James Clerk Maxwell; yes, the Maxwell of del dot B equals zero fame. That was around the 1860!!! Apparently Maxwell was the first to propose colour sep for capturing and displaying colour images. Nobody was thinking of multilayer colour film at the time, much less colour roll film or c41 or e6 or whatever.

    Doing IR colour sep will be easy. The interesting wrinkle is what colour channel you dump the IR info into; IR is, of course, invisible to us and doesn't have a colour. So it is a matter of choice. For spy photos you'd probably want the IR to be something other than red so that it stands out from that adjacent colour. But for more pleasing images I suspect that putting the IR image into the red or deep red channel of the final image will work. People can simply try and see for themselves... many creative possibilities here.

    Of course, the individual b&w images could also be developed as positives, they don't have to be developed as negs.

    Smart chemists like Ron could tell us how to make IR autochromes.

    As certain film options go off the market, we'll simply rediscover all the ingenious things that people used to do. It'll be fun, it really will.
     
  23. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Touche!!

    Stephen Frizza's example there is an awesome one.

    The comment about static subjects could be rememedied with a one-shot camera...
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum127/79720-one-shot-cameras-any-resources.html

    Dye-transfer is definitely not the only way to do this and as has been discussed, is a difficult process to "jump into" due to the lack of supplies readily available. Tri-color carbon would probably be a better option, carbro, etc. Not to mention tri-color gum bichromate. Or, one could tone the separations individually with chemical and/or dye-toning to achieve loose seps that could be registered for the sake of display/scanning/printing.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/...oning-primary-complementary-color-toning.html

    Lastly, I'd like to know more on the last comment about IR screen-plate (autochromes) photographs. I actually had this same idea but can't quite reason how it could be done. The screen would have to go thru a registration shift, since the encoding filter would have to be opaque and the viewing filer would have to be red....... [... another day i s'pose]
     
  24. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    Something definitely Christopher Walken-ish about those eyes...
    hmmm...that explains a lot! :tongue::tongue::tongue::tongue:
     
  25. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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  26. happyjam64

    happyjam64 Member

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    Ah-ha, thanks holmgurgers, that was exactly what I was looking for! Now, what infrared film is closest to the curve of the cyan layer...