Identify this Kodak folding camera

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by thicktheo, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. thicktheo

    thicktheo Subscriber

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    So, I stumbled into this camera last night (see attached photos) and I was amazed when I opened the back - this camera accepts some sort of roll film (wooden rollers) but it is bigger than medium format film. As a matter of fact, it comes pretty close to large format film, only its ratio is more like 3:2 than 5:4. The bellows were in a sad state, the lens looked OK, the (Bausch & Lomb) shutter didn't want to obey any settings (although it did fire at a very fast speed), the overall condition could be described as "junk"... but I still want to find out which model it is.

    Any idea on the model number, production dates, lens, etc?


    PS: sorry for the crappy smartphone photos.
     

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  2. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    It looks like a 3A. There are many different models of that particular camera, some made in Britain and some in the states. I have one with a Zeiss Tessar on a Koilos shutter that has a separate plate back and holders as well as the roll back. The lenses are good cheap ways to break into 4 x 5. Assume the shutter is firing at about 1/25 and go for it. That's what my old beat up shutters seem to settle at when they don't adjust anymore. if the bellows were serviceable you might put in a mask and set the thing up for 120. You can get 6 x 12 images on roll film with some care.
     
  3. thicktheo

    thicktheo Subscriber

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    That's the one! Exactly the same as this one: http://www.vintagephoto.tv/3afpk.shtml

    ...but at a much worse state. I don't think the bellows are serviceable, and the body is in a really poor condition, thus I don't think there's much point in trying to restore the camera to its former glory, but at least I can inform its owner about its age.
     
  4. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    hi theo

    in addition to the killer advice whitey gave you ...
    if you dispose of your camera, GRAB the empty rolls !
    it takes 122 size film for "post card" format ...

    i use mine for paper negatives ...
    you trim one of the long edges off of a sheet of 5x7 paper
    stick it in the back of your camera and close it works every time! :smile:
    i have also gotten into the habit of rolling my own spools of
    paper and making paper negatives that way ...
    (you have to have more than one spool to do that trick :smile: )

    great format, have fun !
    john
     
  5. jstout

    jstout Subscriber

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    more info

    Just for fun, if you want to read detailed info about your camera, try going to Butkus in the Kodak section, as there are many brochures there about the many different models, lenses, and shutters of that era.

    Here is a link for convenience: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/kodak/kodak_1924_cameras/kodak_1924.htm

    I like the 1924 Catalog, but there are many others.
     
  6. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I have something similar, Kodak Autographic 1A. The film, of course, is no longer available for mine or yours. It used really wide post card sized negative as John has already said. That doesn't mean we can't have fun though. I have put a regular 120 film in it and used a small spool of dental floss on both sides of the spool, then used the correct spool for take-up spool. It actually works but you'll have to experiment and guess the correct frame position by number of turns. You'll also have to cover up the red counter window.

    Amazingly enough, it made images. Not great but still made some pictures..... There's something really refreshing about using these simple old cameras and still make photographs. It makes one rethink about all the electronics, automation, and complications in today's gear.

    Anyway, why not tape up the holes in the bellows and play?
     
  7. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    Here's a shot taken with a 3A on 120 film - with something close to what tkamiya says was done to his.
    3A1web.jpg
     
  8. dehk

    dehk Member

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    I loaded up 120 on a similar camera too, fun thing to do!
     
  9. fotch

    fotch Member

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    I have a unopened roll, 122 roll film B & W Kodak Verichrome Pan 100, expire Jan-58, wonder if its still good.
     
  10. thicktheo

    thicktheo Subscriber

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    The bellows have "imploded". I didn't even dare to apply some pressure for the fear that they might crumble. It's a shame, but I don't think this camera can be repaired (at a reasonable cost).
     
  11. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    you can always repair it with a black plastic or black light proof cloth and make a bag bellows :smile:

    good luck !
    john